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Eat Arkansas

Heights Corner Market (nee Terry's) is open

Heights Corner Market, in the space occupied by Terry's Finer Foods since time immemorial at 5018 Kavanaugh Blvd., is open and selling fresh flowers, produce (including locally grown food), meat, seafood, organic bath and body products and organic pet products from Stella's Barkery.

Ahoy! Blue Sail launches Saturday on Main Street

Blue Sail Coffee Roasters opens its shop Saturday, March 25, in the Little Rock Technology Park, 417 Main St. The grand opening announcement says the shop will be in business at 7 a.m. and stay open until 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

Arsaga's at The Depot a hit for coffee and breakfast anytime

Fayetteville spot serves up good coffee and a unique menu.

Dining Review

Go North

March 23, 2017
Go North
Park Hill bar gets high marks. /more/

Dining Search

A&E Feature

The Savage truth

March 23, 2017
The Savage truth
Talking Feynman and failure with science champion Adam Savage. /more/

To-Do List

Margot Lee Shetterly speaks at Statehouse Convention Center

March 23, 2017
Margot Lee Shetterly speaks at Statehouse Convention Center
Also, Dan Baird & Homemade Sin, 'Dear Black People,' Haydn's 'Emperor,' The Steel Wheels, 'Moving Forward,' Hard Pass, Cedric Burnside Project, Jay Jennings at Argenta Reading Series /more/

Columnists

Max Brantley

Don't cry for Robert E. Lee

Congratulations are in order for Governor Hutchinson. He decided this year to devote the weight /more/

Ernest Dumas

Attack the poor

What do Pope Francis and the Republican Party have in common? I'm waiting. Let's make /more/

Gene Lyons

More on pits

Some years ago, I visited the local Boys Club early one morning. There had been a break-in. /more/

Movie Reviews

Wanted: 1991 Magic

March 23, 2017
Wanted: 1991 Magic
'Beauty and the Beast' revamp gets lost in the details. /more/

Pearls About Swine

Foul play

March 23, 2017
This beautiful little ride couldn't have just ended conventionally. That's not the Razorback way. /more/

Blog Roll

Arkansas Blog

Hourly news and comment

Rock Candy

The guide to Arkansas entertainment

Eat Arkansas

For food lovers

Eye Candy

On art in Arkansas

Street Jazz

A view from Northwest Arkansas

Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 09:34:00

Repeal Obamacare: The GOP crusade was just a charade

Republicans made clear last week that the long campaign to repeal Obamacare was never about principle or policy, only the politics of Obama destruction. So writes Ernest Dumas about a historic blunder last week that exposed a clueless president .

Read on:

/more/  

 

Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 07:47:00

Trump paternalism: A strategy, not a gaffe, writer suggests

click to enlarge c7n2djax0aeoexx.jpg

When Donald Trump met with House Republicans to talk about cutting maternity care, contraception and abortion out of basic health coverage in the U.S., the male gathering, shown above, drew lots of social media attention.

Jill Filipovic of the New York Times considers the convergence of image and policy and decides in this op-ed that it may not be a gaffe but a continuation of Trump electoral strategy.

This isn’t the first celebratory photo the White House has released of men cutting health care for women. When Mr. Trump signed the global “gag rule,” which pulls United States funding from organizations abroad that so much as mention the word “abortion” (even organizations that don’t provide abortions), he did it flanked by a half-dozen white men in suits. The rule is an order that primarily affects women in developing countries, who will see their access to contraception and even basic services like malaria treatment constrained by funding cuts that politicize global health. That image was similar to one of President George W. Bush surrounded entirely by grinning men as he signed a ban on a rare abortion procedure.

At some point, we have to ask: Is this really a pattern of errors? Maybe these aren’t tone-deaf mistakes at all, but intentional messages to right-wing supporters.

President Trump ran a campaign of aggrieved masculinity, appealing to men who felt their rightful place in society has been taken from them by a stream of immigrants stealing their jobs, women who don’t need husbands to support them, and members of minority groups who don’t work as hard but still get special treatment.

Mr. Trump oozes male entitlement, from his brash insistence that he’s the best at everything despite knowing very little about anything to his history of crass sexism. Liberal political analysts, and even some conservative ones, assumed that would hurt him in a more feminist world. With women, it did, though not as much as people might have expected. It didn’t hurt him with men, though — Mr. Trump won them with the biggest gender gap since the advent of exit polling. That he was running against Hillary Clinton, the quintessential Hermione outsmarting the boys in class, brought this white masculinity message into sharper relief: Trump supporters didn’t just oppose Mrs. Clinton, they hated her with unchecked phallic rage, wearing “Trump That Bitch” T-shirts.
There's more. But I think she may be onto something.

 

Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 07:34:00

Pour on the coal: Trump to reverse Obama on cleaner air

Donald Trump is expected to sign an executive order reversing the federal government's course on attempting to reduce pollution from power plants. Jobs will be more important than cleaner air, in short.

Like a lot of things that Trump has set out to do, a change of course in the Environmental Protection Agency is easier said than done, as Vox explains here at some length.

The Arkansas business establishment and Republican politicians will cheer the news, of course. They like status quo: Burn coal, fill air with CO2. Stimulating alternative, cleaner sources of power is a jobs stimulus of a high order and, in the long run, not even more expensive.  But never mind that. We like doing things the way we've always done them.

UPDATE: From the Sierra Club:

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that, by 2030, the Clean Power Plan would prevent 150,000 asthma attacks and up to 6,600 premature deaths annually, providing between $55 billion to $93 billion of benefits per year.

EPA also projects that in 2030 when the plan is fully implemented, electricity bills would be roughly 8 percent lower than they would been without the actions in state plans. That would save Americans about $8 on an average monthly residential electricity bill.

In response to today’s news, Glen Hooks, Director of the Sierra Club’s Arkansas Chapter, released the following statement:

“Trump and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt are doing what they do best - enriching their friends in oil and gas while rolling back protections on clean air and water for the rest of us. The roll back of the Clean Power Plan and other clean air and clean water protections will cost us our lives and our health, as well as money and savings for Arkansans who are sick of propping up Entergy’s aging and dirty coal plants with their hard-earned money.

“No matter Trump or Pruitt’s shortsighted actions, coal is on the decline in Arkansas. The economics do not favor these aging plants. We’ll keep moving ahead on a community level to organize and build a thriving clean energy economy in Arkansas and a responsible path forward with new, family-sustaining opportunities for communities historically dependent on coal.”


 

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 09:31:00

TheatreSquared asks Fayetteville A&P Commission to match city's $3.1 million commitment

click to enlarge An artist's rendering of the new TheatreSquared facility from ournextstage.org. - KILOGRAPH
  • Kilograph
  • An artist's rendering of the new TheatreSquared facility from ournextstage.org.

The Fayetteville Flyer reports that TheatreSquared Artistic Director Bob Ford and Executive Director Martin Miller met with the Fayetteville Advertising & Promotion Committee Monday morning, asking for a $3.1 million match to the city's pledged funding in the same amount as part of a five-year economic development plan, Fayetteville First.

The funding request is part of T2's attempt to raise $18 million for the construction of a new facility at West Avenue and Spring Streets, across from the Walton Arts Center's Nadine Baum Studios where the nonprofit professional theatre company currently leases space. More specifically, the Walton Family Foundation pledged an amount of $9 million in January for the new facility, contingent upon T2's raising $18 million in a 2-to-1 match. That's in addition to the $3.5 million the Foundation awarded to the company for the new theater's design.

TheatreSquared expects construction to begin later this year, and projects opening in time to hold its 2019 season in the new facility.

 

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 11:18:00

Arkansas Times Film Series presents 'Bunny Lake Is Missing' tonight

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In concert with Film Quotes Film and Riverdale 10 Cinema, Arkansas Times Film Series presents Otto Preminger's 1965 suspense “Bunny Lake is Missing." Film Quotes Film's Omaya Jones discussed the film in this week's arts and entertainment section.

Shortly after the film begins, Anne Lake (Carol Lynley) goes to pick up her daughter, Bunny, from school. She wonders around the waiting room with a crowd of mothers who are also there waiting to pick up their Bunnys. School ends, the group of mothers dissipate. Only Anne is left, and there is no Bunny. The rest of the film exists in a nightmare state where the viewer is never quite sure of what to make of what is going on — or if Bunny even exists. It’s a terrifying prospect. The only other film that so successfully elicits a sense of total discombobulation is Orson Welles' “The Trial,” adapted from the Kafka story of the same name, and every facet of the camerawork works toward producing this feeling; it’s classical in style, keeping an objective distance, moving subtly in lieu of wild pans and closeups. It almost has the sense of a police procedural. Penelope and John Mortimer adapted the screenplay from a novel by Merriam Modell, thanks to a reprinting of the work from The Feminist Press, a publisher whose “Femme Fatales” line of books is devoted to reprinting pulp novels by women. Modell was a graduate of Cornell University and, after living abroad, settled into life as a writer of short stories and suspense novels under the pen name Evelyn Piper. Many of her stories, Modell’s New York Times obituary reads, “had a common theme: the domestic conflicts faced by American families.” The film moves the setting from New York to London to further heighten the sense of loneliness and isolation Anne feels as she searches for her daughter, in a new place surrounded by strange people who mostly think she’s insane. 
The Arkansas Times Film Series is co-presented by Film Quotes Film, and is accompanied by a set of podcasts exploring the creative and historical contexts of the movies featured. Tonight's screening begins at 7 p.m., and tickets can be purchased in advance at Riverdale 10's website.

click to enlarge bunny-lake-is-missing-3.jpg





 

Friday, March 17, 2017 - 16:07:00

The art of the book, Cuban-style, at UA Little Rock's Ottenheimer Library

click to enlarge On display at the Ottenheimer Library. - CARLY MACHIN, UA LITTLE ROCK COMMUNICATIONS
  • Carly Machin, UA Little Rock Communications
  • On display at the Ottenheimer Library.

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock's Ottenheimer Library has opened an exhibition, "Binding Communities: Cuba's Ediciones Vigia and the Art of the Book and Entrpreneurism," from the handmade collective in Matanzas, Cuba. Book artist Steven Miller of the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa will give a talk on the show, which includes works by 71 artists, at 5 p.m. tonight, May March 17, in the Fine Arts Building, Room 161.

Here's some interesting information on the collective from UALR:

Ediciones Vigía (“Lighthouse Editions”) of Matanzas, Cuba, came of age during the so-called Cuban Special Period, a time of economic depression following the 1989 collapse of the Soviet Union. Throughout the 1990s, an extreme shortage of paper and materials – not to mention food, petroleum, medicine, and other basic resources – contributed to difficulties in publishing in Cuba. Vigía responded by seeking out diverse, talented young authors to publish in limited edition artists’ books (each printing is limited to 200 copies). Community members from Matanzas would gather together to assemble these books out of found materials, such as cardboard and fabric scraps, and butcher paper, which was less expensive and more available than bleached white paper. These precious books have quickly earned an artistic cachet that carries prestige for its authors and captivates international scholars and collectors.
Upcoming events related to the show include a talk by UALR professors David Clemons and Dr. Erin Finzer of UALR at 4:30 p.m. March 29 at the Applied Design Studio, University Plaza 300; "Up Close and Personal: Student Presentations of Select Vigia Books," 3 p.m. April 6 in Ottenheimer Library, Room 535; a screening of "Ediciones Vigia: Poetica visual/Visual Poetics" and tour with Finzer, 5 p.m. April 12, Ottenheimer Library, Room 535; and a closing reception and lecture by Vigia scholar and filmmaker Dr. Juanamaria Cordones Cook, 4:30 p.m. April 17, Ottenheimer Library, Room 535.

 

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ARKids turns 20

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