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Culinary art

December 1, 2016
Culinary art
Canvas, the new restaurant in the Arkansas Arts Center, impresses. /more/

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A&E Feature

In the glow of the leg lamp

December 1, 2016
In the glow of the leg lamp
Reclaiming 'A Christmas Story' at the Rep. /more/

Columnists

Max Brantley

Kids count, not confidentiality

The trial for the murder of Isaiah Torres, 6, was a reminder again of a gaping hole in the law pertaining to child protective services. /more/

Ernest Dumas

Fake economics

Fake news is a new phenomenon in the world of politics and policy, but hokey economic scholarship has been around as long as Form 1040 and is about as reliable as the news hoaxes that enlivened the presidential campaign. /more/

Gene Lyons

Forget identity politics

Amid the climate of disbelief and fear among Democrats following Donald Trump's election, a fascinating debate has broken out about what's called "identity politics" on the left, "political correctness" by the right. /more/

Movie Reviews

Not a princess

December 1, 2016
Not a princess
'Moana' subverts the Disney 'wedding bell' formula. /more/

Pearls About Swine

Woeful

December 1, 2016
On Thanksgiving night, Bret Bielema could settle into his bed knowing that after a rather miserable 2013 inauguration, he had slipped comfortably into his job and the results were bearing some small but edible fruits for this ravenous fan base. He was only 25-24, but 18-10 with two bowl wins over his last 28 contests, a smattering of takedowns of ranked teams, and a stabilized roster that showed off the staff's endeavors to enlist and develop a caliber of player that would lead to better days ahead in a rugged conference. /more/

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Sunday, December 4, 2016 - 22:01:00

Rapert compares Bill Clinton to Orval Faubus

click to enlarge rapertcapitolview.jpg

Sen. Jason Rapert (R-Conway)  was on "Capitol View" on KARK, Channel 4, this morning, and among other things that will likely inspire you to yell at your computer screen, he said he expected someone in the legislature to file a bill to do ... something about changing the name of the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport. Because local control is an important value until it's inconvenient. The Little Rock Airport Commission, made up of seven members appointed by Little Rock's City Board, elected to change the name of the airport to honor the Clintons in 2010.

Rapert's segment begins around 10 minutes.

"A gentleman called me and he said, ‘Remember Governor Orval Faubus?' He was one of the longest serving governors in our state," Rapert said. "Put in a lot of programs that actually benefited the state. However, he had an opinion — of course, dealing with the Little Rock Central High crisis — that left him in a real bad position. You don't see monuments to Orval Faubus around the state of Arkansas."

"Are you comparing the Clintons to Orval Faubus?" host Drew Petrimoulx asked. "Well Orval Faubus never did seduce an intern in the White House Oval Office and get impeached over it." Rapert answered. "And Orval Faubus never also delete 30,000 emails while he was under FBI investigation. And he also has not had multiple affairs. I don't think honoring a serial adulterer is the image we want to project ... "

 

Sunday, December 4, 2016 - 12:42:00

The gloomy Sunday line

I'm about to be indisposed for a while, but I'll try to check in later.

For now, over to you.

 

Sunday, December 4, 2016 - 12:41:00

New York Times columnist calls Pine Bluff nonprofit leader "America's Mother Teresa"

click to enlarge Annette Dove with New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof.
  • Annette Dove with New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof.
Annette Dove, the founder and CEO of the Pine Bluff nonprofit Targeting Our People's Priorities with Service (TOPPS), is the subject of a glowing column profile by the New York Times Nicholas Kristof. In the wake of a a dispiriting election, Dove is "a salve for our aches and wounds, for she represents the American grass roots’ best," Kristoff writes.

TOPPS works with at-risk youth and families in Pine Bluff, providing an array of services, including after school, feeding and mentoring programs.

From the column:

Dove, 60, is a black woman who dropped out of high school when she became pregnant and who has endured racism and domestic abuse. Drawing on her own experience overcoming difficulties, she now runs a widely admired program for troubled children. Funding the program in part with her own savings — even going into personal bankruptcy to keep it going — she transforms lives.

Dove works seven days a week and struggles month to month to pay the bills with donations, foundation support and a state grant; when the money runs out, she prays.

 

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Friday, December 2, 2016 - 17:52:00

Arkansas Times Recommends: A Gift Guide

Arkansas Times Recommends is a series in which Times staff members (or whoever happens to be around at the time) highlight things we've been enjoying this week. This week, we offer suggestions for the gift-giving season.

click to enlarge southern_pecan_toffee_46278.1453433510.1280.1280.png

There are so many ways to eat toffee. You can just snarf it down in chunks and chomp a while on the crunchy combo of chocolate, nuts and magically transformed butter and sugar. Or you can separate the chocolate from the hard caramel and eat it first and the candy second. Or the reverse of that. Or you can just put a piece in your mouth and see how long you can savor it there before you must chew.

However you like to eat your toffee, you will really like it if is Lambrecht toffee, made in Heber Springs for more than a decade but sold as Lambrecht since 2008 when David and Nancy Smith of Heber Springs decided to become their own company. A friend brought some over recently and I sniffed, saying I didn’t eat such fattening things. I am too strong for that. Actually, I knew I’d be lost if I took a bite of Lambrecht’s Southern Pecan toffee. After an hour, though, I couldn’t stand it anymore. I started out with slow nibbles, but before I knew it I was mowing through the bag like a chipper through wood. I did not confess that I was not a Lambrecht virgin, either. I have an 8-ounce box of Lambrecht’s Karma, made with slivered almonds, hidden in my closet for stocking gifts.

-Leslie Newell Peacock

click to enlarge framed_art_print.jpg

In my opinion, there has never been an administration who put low-income and poverty-stricken Americans, people of color, immigrants, the LGBTQ community, women, children, and the elderly high enough on its list of things to elevate and empower with the resources they need. This is particularly consequential in rural America. The McElroy House in Dardanelle agrees now more than ever. They are a "grassroots community-based organization working to find local solutions to local problems" in Pope and Yell counties. Get details on their Facebook page. If you want to support what you see and get someone you know a nice little gift, go to bit.ly/mcelroy-in-the-fall. (Full disclosure: 1. I am the husband of the founder, 2. I am a member, 3. I created this artwork for the McElroy House, and 4. I am donating 100% of the profit to the McElroy House. Just so you all know.)

-Bryan Moats

click to enlarge lf.png
Perhaps the only thing more difficult that buying a gift for someone without hints as to what they want is advising strangers what to buy for other strangers. I've found most gifts people give you if they didn't know what to do fall into 2 categories, gift cards (AWESOME) or something that you will both pretend was cool, but was clearly a "screw it this is 20 bucks and it's here" decision.

But this year will be different. A friend is sending me a custom hockey jersey with my name on the back and I could not be more excited, though there are few places where wearing is would feel normal in Little Rock. Buy your sports fan a custom jersey straight from the NFL. They will love your for it, and it's not too pricey.

-Brian Chilson

click to enlarge unnamed.jpg

The best Christmas present this Gen-Xer ever got was given around 1982. Growing up a latchkey kid, watching television after school was clearly the best use of my time, and next to after-school specials, reruns of "I Dream of Jeannie" were what held my attention – and my heart. That year, my momma delivered the best. gift. ever. when she located the Remco "I Dream of Jeannie Dream Bottle." I'm sure it was used, as the original came out in 1976, but my wish had been granted and I couldn't have been happier. Over the years, the bottle was lost, or sold, or given to some younger relative, but to this day I wish I had it. Instead, I'll have to comfort myself with some other cool "I Dream of Jeannie" products. My personal favorites are the handmade stemless wine glasses and the bottle-charm necklace. But I'll take whatever magics its way under my Christmas tree.

-Heather Steadham


We all bemoan the slow creep of the holiday retail messaging's sensory assault ever backward into the "early fall" portion of the calendar year, but I'd suspect that the head start doesn't actually make gift shopping any less harried for most people. The average American's work week doesn't leave much room for pensive strolls along rows of glowing tinsel-clad boutiques, tidy list clutched in hand. Most of us do it from the computer screen. W
ith only a handful of exceptions, I'm able to recall in much more detail the handwritten letters I've received from friends and relatives than I am the contents of the packaged gifts I've opened. For these reasons, I'm inclined to suggest we forego a substantial chunk of our gift-giving altogether, sit in the comfort of our own homes and write letters to our friends and family instead. Before you roll your eyes, I've anticipated (and tried to assuage) a couple of objections to this suggestion.

1. Won't that come across as cheap?

You mean cheaper than it came across when you bought the tree ornament or the noise-cancelling headphones at the Walgreen's down the street from your aunt's house, and then wrapped it in the car? They were never the wiser, but isn't that sort of.....not the point? For most people, gift shopping is a trade-off between time and money. That is, "I don't have enough time to think a lot about the gifts I am giving, so I am spending a twenty dollar bill so that I'll have something." But how many times are we buying the something because it's what you knew the recipient wanted? Look, if you were 100 percent confident that the ornament and headphones were exactly what the doctor ordered, then right on! I am not usually so certain, though, and I've often been left with a less-than-Christmasy feeling when my recipient unwraps a gift I got them just because I felt I needed to walk in the door
with something – anything – in hand.

2. I don't have time!

Yeah, that's a hard one. Worse, the rest of the world goes on Christmas break and into gift crisis mode at roughly the same time you do, which means gift shopping is an activity rife with stoplights,
congestion or – if you avoid all that mess and do it online – shipping costs and wait time. Either way, it takes time, and time is hard to come by. There's a reason we refer to it as a 'commodity,' and a reason why productivity experts are treated like the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. But here's the thing: spending your time connecting with your loved ones – even in a fumbling way – is a pretty sure bet. You might leave the Best Buy empty-handed, exhausted and still starving at 8:30 p.m., but a letter's a letter, and I'd be willing to wager that even the most cynical of your relatives would remember the effort you made, even if they don't remember a word you wrote.

3. I don't know what to write.

Start with this: "I thought I'd try something different this year, and wanted to write a little bit to let you know what's been going on in my life, and to find out what's going on in yours." Then, scroll through your social media posts. Or your phone camera gallery. Or your Google calendar. Chances are, you're gonna find something notable that happened this year to write about. If you don't, ask the recipient some questions. Jokes about gun-totin,' Trump-votin' uncles aside, I think you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who's interviewed any of their family members and regretted doing so. You might find that, having widened the circle of your correspondence past the bounds of your digital connections, you've started up a conversation with someone who's been there in your life all along, but who you barely knew.

-Stephanie Smittle



 

Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 13:57:00

Filmmakers with Arkansas connections selected for Sundance

click to enlarge Amman Abbasi
  • Amman Abbasi

"Dayveon," the Arkansas-set debut feature film from Little Rock's Amman Abbasi, has been selected to premiere at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 19-29 in Utah. It's among the NEXT selections and is scheduled to debut on the first day of the festival.

Abbasi, who worked for years with Little Rock documentarians Brent and Craig Renaud and has long been active in Little Rock's film community, raised $25,000 on Kickstarter in 2015 before a host of indie vets signed on as producers. They include director and Little Rock native David Gordon Green, Rough House Pictures ("Eastbound and Down," "Lawless"), director James Schamus' production company Symbolic Exchange and producer Lisa Muskat's ("Joe") Muskat Filmed Properties.

Here's the Sundance description of the film:

In the wake of his older brother’s death, 13-year-old Dayveon spends the sweltering summer days roaming his rural Arkansas town. When he falls in with a local gang, he becomes drawn to the camaraderie and violence of their world.
From IndieWire:
“I went about making ‘Dayveon’ in a fairly non-traditional way,” said Abbasi. “I started this process like a documentary by learning and talking to actual gang members and work-shopping the story with them to find out why kids join gangs and learn firsthand from their stories. A lot of these stories helped inspire this movie. Hopefully this film paints an honest picture of what it is like to be brought into a gang as a kid.”

“’Dayveon’ is a cinematic portrait of a kid who joins a gang in rural Arkansas,” said executive producer David Gordon Green. “His journey within the film feels authentic — as if I were a fly on the wall watching him trying to discover how to get over heartbreak, understand violence and become a man.”
click to enlarge Adam Sobel
  • Adam Sobel

Also making its premiere on day one of the festival is the latest documentary from North Little Rock High School graduate Adam Sobel. It's called "The Workers Cup." Here's how Sundance describes it: "Inside Qatar’s labor camps, African and Asian migrant workers building the facilities of the 2022 World Cup compete in a football tournament of their own."

Sobel is a longtime director and producer at Mediadante, a production house based in Doha, Qatar and London. Here's his biography from Mediadante:

Adam tells stories across the Middle East and beyond. Recent work has taken him from Uganda to Berlin to document the impact of war and conflict on education, and to Tunisia and Egypt to look at the five-year aftermath of the Arab Spring. In 2013, Adam spent two months at Mt. Everest base camp creating the 12-part series On the Top, which won the CINE Golden Eagle for best documentary series. He is the director of the feature-length documentary The Workers Cup, which will be making its world premiere at Sundance in January. Adam currently lives in Chicago with his wife, three cats, and the world’s best baby.


 

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:49:22

Name that Arkansas Artist: Daniel Mark Cassity

click to enlarge name_that_arkansas_artist_.jpg
Can you name this Arkansas artist? Sure you can. Give your answers below.


UPDATE: Robin McClea correctly identified Daniel Mark Cassity as the artist on Eye Candy's Facebook page, which I would link to, along with Cassity's web page, if the link function on this blog were working, but it's not. McClea is the artist services program manager at the Arkansas Arts Council. The work above, "The King's Solicitors," will be on exhibit in the International Guild of Realism's "Winter Salon" Jan. 26-Feb. 18 at The Marshall Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. Cassity lives in Hot Springs and is represented in Arkansas by Gallery Central.

 

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