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Arkansas Blog

Hourly news and comment

Rock Candy

The guide to Arkansas entertainment

Eat Arkansas

For food lovers

Eye Candy

On art in Arkansas

Street Jazz

A view from Northwest Arkansas

Eat Arkansas

Three Fold Noodles and Dumpling Co. is just plain good

Downtown Little Rock loves authentic option for noodles, dumplings.

ZAZA turns 9, to celebrate with bluegrass, pizza and a wet mayor

Like pizza cooked in an outdoor wood oven? Live bluegrass? Seeing Mark Stodola dripping wet? While drinking Lost Forty Beer? Then ZAZA Fine Salad and Wood Oven Pizza Co. in the Heights is the place you need to be Sunday, April 23.

Food trucks and craft beers Saturday at the Outlets of LR

A ticketed food truck event, the Arkansas Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival, starts at noon Saturday at the Outlets of Little Rock.

Dining Review

It's a family affair

April 20, 2017
It's a family affair
At the promising Buenos Aires Grill and Cafe. /more/

Dining Search

To-Do List

David Sedaris at Robinson Center

April 20, 2017
David Sedaris at Robinson Center
Also, Tom Petty, Joe Walsh, Sculpture at the River Market, The Wildflower Revue, Konarak Reddy, March for Science, Ballet Arkansas's 'Spring Fantasies,' Red Hot Chili Peppers and more /more/

Columnists

Max Brantley

Executionpalooza

Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate. /more/

Ernest Dumas

Coal is over

The free market's natural search for cheaper and more efficient energy has taken over and even President Trump and a governing party heavily in denial about climate change cannot stop it. /more/

Gene Lyons

Art bull

"God, I hate art," my late friend The Doctor used to say. /more/

Pearls About Swine

Baseball's back

April 13, 2017
Dave Van Horn was authoring the reclamation story of an era throughout the first half of the 2017 baseball season. LSU rudely rejected an initial manuscript over the weekend, but let's not let one painful weekend blemish what's happened so far for the Diamond Hogs. /more/

Blog Roll

Arkansas Blog

Hourly news and comment

Rock Candy

The guide to Arkansas entertainment

Eat Arkansas

For food lovers

Eye Candy

On art in Arkansas

Street Jazz

A view from Northwest Arkansas

Arkansas Blog

Sunday, April 23, 2017 - 13:24:00

The sunny Sunday line

Others may check in. For now, here's an open line.

 

Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 17:28:00

Healthy crowd descends on Capitol for March for Science

click to enlarge Earth Day marchers for science pose for a picture on the steps of the state Capitol.
  • Earth Day marchers for science pose for a picture on the steps of the state Capitol.

America has a president who believes global warming is a Chinese plot, orders an end to clean air and water rules and proposes to reduce funding for the National Institutes of Health. Unfortunately, he not alone in his disdain for science.

But America — including Arkansas — is also a place where vast numbers protested this Earth Day against science-blind, profit-driven and superstitious policymaking, both in D.C. and by the Arkansas Legislature. Hundreds, perhaps as many as a thousand, turned out on a dreary, cold Saturday for the Arkansas March for Science that started at 1 p.m. The crowd, carrying signs saying such things as "I've seen better cabinets at Ikea," "A Good Planet is Hard to Find," "Clean Energy Jobs Now," "I'm a steminist," "Denial is Dangerous," and "Science is Not a Partisan Issue," filled several blocks of Fifth Street as it moved toward the state Capitol.

State Sierra Club Executive Director Glen Hooks, Arkansas State University professor of philosophy Dr. Michele Merritt, local Science Guy Kevin Delaney and other speakers — too young to remember the early days of the space race when science reigned in America and we all saw "Our Friend the Atom" every year in science class — urged our state and national leaders to once again embrace facts and use science to make our lives better. It's a message that Hooks said the state Legislature isn't getting, governing instead by anecdote and promoting an anti-intellectual climate in which people are ridiculed people for being educated.

"Maybe you're a hunter who needs good science to keep forests and habitat health. A farmer who needs science to grow food," Hooks said, or a fisherman who wants clean water or a researcher or doctor or parent: "Science matters. ... But I'm not seeing that it matters enough to our elected officials and decision-makers." Instead, Hooks said he sees legislators and governor "actively ignoring" scientific data.

Delaney, who works with the Museum of Discovery, a cosponsor of the event, and has made regular appearances on the Tonight Show with his fun science demonstrations, related to the crowd the tragic story of 19th century Austrian Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis, who realized he could reduce the death rate in his clinic by requiring doctors to wash their hands, but was eventually driven mad by the scientific community's ridicule of the idea.

Delaney said it now seems absurd to think that one need not wash one's hands to keep from spreading germs. It is also absurd, he said, "To deny scientific evidence and fact.  ...  Our lawmakers need to understand that to continue to deny human-caused climate change is as equally absurd as to deny the existence of germs," he said, adding, "And we have considerably more evidence than Ignaz had."

Other speakers included Sarah Thomas, a student at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences who has multiple sclerosis and is focusing her research on the disease. "When our policy makers start wanting to cut [science funding] that kills a lot of dreams for us," Thomas said. Haleigh Eubanks, a fifth year doctoral candidate in interdisciplinary science at UAMS, said she represented both people of color and "nasty women" (getting a huge cheer there) pursuing careers in science. She noted the international flavor of UAMS' medical and research teams (some who could be affected by Donald Trump's anti-Muslim immigration ban) and the important work being done there. "I want to let Donald Trump know that you cannot pretend to make America great if you threaten STEM research" and make policy with "imaginary facts," Eubanks said. She quoted scientist Bill Nye, saying, "Science is the key to our future, and if you don't believe in science, then you're holding everybody back."

 

Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 13:38:00

The gloomy Saturday line

I've got some obligations today, but I'll try to check in later.

In the meantime, tell us something good.

 

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Rock Candy

Friday, April 21, 2017 - 15:43:00

Big night in Argenta: Harringtons at Laman, a Southern spring at Greg Thompson

click to enlarge "Quiche Lorraine" by Jed Jackson, at Greg Thompson Fine Art.
  • "Quiche Lorraine" by Jed Jackson, at Greg Thompson Fine Art.

click to enlarge Neal and Tammy Harrington, in "Twenty" at the Laman Library Argenta Branch.
  • Neal and Tammy Harrington, in "Twenty" at the Laman Library Argenta Branch.
Neal Harrington, Tammy Harrington, Jed Jackson, Alan Gerson, Dolores Justus, Stephano Sutherlin: Those are six reasons — and there are many more — to head over to Argenta tonight for the monthly ArtWalk, 5-8 p.m.

The Argenta Branch of the Laman Library (420 Main St.) opens "Twenty," woodcuts by Neal Harrington and lithographs by Tammy Harrington of Russellville. Then cross Main to see North Little Rock High School's "Senior Exhibition" at the Thea Foundation (401 Main St.); "Downtown Throw Down," works by the Latino Project, at Core Brewery (411 Main St.); "FACES," work by Stephano at Argenta Gallery (413 Main St.); a reception at StudioMAIN, the architects collaborative (413 Main); pottery at Claytime Pottery Shop (417 Main St.); and the "Spring Exhibition," featuring Gerson, Jackson, Justus and other Southern artists at Greg Thompson Fine Art (429 Main St.).

Then head up Main to see "Outside the Lines," artworks by Arkansas Democrat-Gazette illustrators Nikki Dawes, Kirk Montgomery, Dusty Higgins and Ron Wolfe at Mugs Cafe (515 Main St.); and visit the Barry Thomas Fine Art & Studio (711 Main St.).

Also tonight, the House of Art, 109 E. Fourth St., hosts Chicago rapper "Real T@lk" from 8-11 p.m. The House of Art will open at 5 p.m. for ArtWalk.

 

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 15:06:00

Louise Halsey chosen 2017 Arkansas Living Treasure

click to enlarge Halsey, in her studio in the Ozarks.
  • Halsey, in her studio in the Ozarks.

click to enlarge "38 State Street," wool weft on linen warp.
  • "38 State Street," wool weft on linen warp.
Weaver Louise Halsey of Oark, who creates fine art, rugs and dolls, and whose weavings of houses on fire ignited such admiration that she was included in the 2012 Women to Watch exhibition at the National Museum for Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., has been named by the Arkansas Arts Council as the 2017 Arkansas Living Treasure. The annual award goes to a dedicated craftsperson who has helped preserve the craft by teaching to others.

Halsey will be honored at a public reception from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. May 4 at New Deal Studios and Gallery, 2003 S. Louisiana St.

A little background on the artist, from the Arts Council press release (in full on jump):
Halsey began her education at Sarah Lawrence College in New York, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy. She studied weaving at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina and Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Tennessee, as well as the University of Wisconsin and the University of Georgia. In 2007, at the age of 55, she received her Master of Fine Arts degree in interdisciplinary arts from Goddard College in Vermont.

Halsey is the 16th artist to be named a Living Treasure. She joins a fine group of artisans who have received the award: Eleanor Lux, a weaver and beader; pysanky artist Lorrie Popow; potters Jim Larkin, Peter Lippincott and Winston Taylor; wood sculptor Robyn Horn; fiddle maker Violet Hensley and basket maker Leon Niehues, among others.

/more/  

 

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 14:40:00

New videos from The Wildflower Revue and Couch Jackets

Check out this Talking Heads cover from The Wildflower Revue at the trio's Dreamland Ballroom shindig earlier this year, featuring a mean violin solo from Arkansas Symphony Orchestra Geoffrey Robson and Bonnie Montgomery singing in French. The trio performs with special guests at Ron Robinson Theater Friday, April 21, 7 p.m., and you can grab tickets here.


And, in case you missed it: a new little fairytale from Conway quartet Couch Jackets. It involves: a dream sequence with an angel who grants enchanted vaporizers to "the disillusioned strangers that needed them most," four men walking and holding hands well before Netherlanders Alexander Pechtold and Wouter Koolmees made a statement by doing so, a basketball showdown that ends in someone's hand getting shot off and an epilogue for closure.


 

More Rock Candy

Visit Arkansas

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Chuck Haralson and Ken Smith were inducted into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame during the 43rd annual Governor’s Conference on Tourism

Most Shared

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
  • Art bull

    "God, I hate art," my late friend The Doctor used to say.
  • Not justice

    The strongest, most enduring calls for the death penalty come from those who feel deeply the moral righteousness of "eye-for-an-eye" justice, or retribution. From the depths of pain and the heights of moral offense comes the cry, "The suffering you cause is the suffering you shall receive!" From the true moral insight that punishment should fit the crime, cool logic concludes, "Killers should be killed." Yet I say: retribution yes; death penalty no.
  • Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

    Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.
  • The Ledell Lee execution thread

    Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.

Cover Story

The Little Rock millage question: taxation without representation?

April 20, 2017
The Little Rock millage question: taxation without representation?
Frustration with the state's takeover of Little Rock schools scrambles the usual political lines on an upcoming millage election. /more/

VIEW PRINT EDITION

Most Viewed

  • Lee's lawyer writes about executed man's last hours

    Lee Short, the lawyer for Ledell Lee, the man Arkansas put to death just before midnight last night, posted on Facebook the following letter of thanks for personal support and a bit about Lee's last hours, distributing his possessions and talking to family.
  • It's a family affair

    At the promising Buenos Aires Grill and Cafe.
  • Not justice

    The strongest, most enduring calls for the death penalty come from those who feel deeply the moral righteousness of "eye-for-an-eye" justice, or retribution. From the depths of pain and the heights of moral offense comes the cry, "The suffering you cause is the suffering you shall receive!" From the true moral insight that punishment should fit the crime, cool logic concludes, "Killers should be killed." Yet I say: retribution yes; death penalty no.
  • State spends $30,000 drug testing TANF recipients for drugs, nabs 2.

    Think Progress reported yesterday that 13 states spent a total of $1.3 million to perform 2,826 drug tests on persons seeking funds from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Of those nearly 3,000 people required to pee in a cup to get assistance for their families, 369 tested positive.
  • The Little Rock millage question: taxation without representation?

    Frustration with the state's takeover of Little Rock schools scrambles the usual political lines on an upcoming millage election.

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Arkansas Reporter

Arkansas death penalty FAQ

April 12, 2017
Arkansas death penalty FAQ
A primer on the state's execution plan. /more/

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