Thursday, July 1, 2010

Little Rock evicts squatters from historic house

Posted By on Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 1:50 PM

TRASHED: Capitol District director Boyd Maher surveys trash at historic house.
  • Kelli Peters
  • TRASHED: Capitol Zoning District director Boyd Maher surveys trash at historic house.

The White-Baucum House at 201 S. Izard, a once-grand Italianate house built in the 19th century by the Arkansas secretary of state, has most recently been the home of several squatters. Little Rock police ushered out five or six people in the house around 10 a.m. this morning and code enforcement officers began a clean-up, shoveling out truckloads of trash and clothing and a bit of drug paraphernalia to boot.

In the late 1970s, the house was purchased by Don Mehlburger Engineers, but a city employee on the scene and a Quapaw Quarter Association board member said they believed the house is now owned by
a bank in Russellville (calls in to Tracy Roark, head of city neighborhood programs, to confirm). The city put a sign up in front of the house recently putting owners on notice that it was in violation of code, but squatters took the sign down. Windows in the house had been boarded up but its new residents were able to take the boards down and break glass to enter. Every room in the house showed signs of occupation — bed rolls, old clothes, cheetos, vomit and the like.

Around 10:45, a former occupant showed up and asked if he could retrieve his “medication,” and he was allowed to.

The house, which was altered by the various businesses that have occupied it since the 1950s, is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was built by Arkansas Secretary of State Robert J.T. White in 1869-1870. George F. Baucum, a cotton broker, wholesale grocery businessman, president of the Bank of Little Rock and one of the founders of the Board of Trade in Little Rock, bought the house in the mid-1920s. Lora B. Busick occupied the house from 1935 to 1957. Since then, it’s housed two restaurants, an interior design studio, a nightclub, an ad agency and the Mehlburger firm.

— Leslie Newell Peacock

Tags: , , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (21)

Showing 1-21 of 21

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-21 of 21

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Democrats back medical marijuana, sort of

    An AP Twitter caught my attention with this headline: "Eldridge, Arkansas Democrats back medical marijuana." The full story is more nuanced in the current Arkansas context.
    • Aug 29, 2016
  • Democrats sue to removed convicted Republican from House ballot

    State Rep. Johnnie Bolin, represented by the Democratic Party counsel Chris Burks, sued today in Drew County to have Republican James Hall removed from the November general election ballot as the Republican candidate for the currently vacant House District 9 seat.
    • Aug 29, 2016
  • Another week, another open line

    Here's the Monday open line and the daily news video.
    • Aug 29, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Eureka Springs City Council passes civil rights ordinance, sets stage for potential lawsuit

    The Eureka Springs City Council last night suspended the rules and hurriedly passed a civil rights ordinance that extends anti-discrimination protection to gay people in employment, housing and public accommodations. It sets up a potential legal challenge if the legislature completes passage of a law aimed at preserving legal discrimination against gay people.
    • Feb 10, 2015
  • Following the money on the Walton-Hutchinson takeover of Little Rock schools

    Judgment day nears on HB 1733, which would implement the Walton billionaires' aim to take over the Little Rock School District. Their tentacles are many. And don't be confused by assurances that they only want a moderate amount of so-called reform.
    • Mar 15, 2015
  • Mike Maggio pleads guilty to federal bribery charge

    Former Circuit Judge Mike Maggio of Conway pleaded guilty to federal bribery charges on Friday in U.S. District Court. The offense carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
    • Jan 9, 2015

Most Shared

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation