Thursday, February 24, 2011

Lyon family gives $1.5 million to UAMS

Posted By on Thu, Feb 24, 2011 at 10:14 AM

Frank and Jane Lyon have given $1.5 million to the UAMS Institute on Aging for an expansion project.


Jane and Frank Lyon Jr., today donated $1.5 million to the Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). The gift gives a significant boost toward the required matching funds for the expansion project.

“We are absolutely delighted and appreciative to receive such a visionary, generous gift from Mr. and Mrs. Lyon,” said Jeanne Wei, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Institute on Aging and chair of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatrics in the UAMS College of Medicine. “Their generosity will enable us to help our senior Arkansans improve their cardiovascular health.”

The 55,000-square-foot expansion is scheduled for completion in February 2012. Construction is being funded by a $27.9 million Donald W. Reynolds Foundation gift, announced in June 2009. Under terms of the gift, the Institute on Aging can’t move into the new space until it raises $5.6 million to support programs there. With the Lyon gift, the institute moved past the halfway mark at $3.4 million.

Frank Lyon noted that his parents, Frank and Marian, and Jane’s parents, Henry and Helen Thomas, all were beneficiaries of the advanced geriatric care provided at the Reynolds Institute on Aging.

The Lyon and Thomas families’ gratitude led to a $2.5 million gift in 2007 that established the Thomas and Lyon Longevity Clinic.

“The Reynolds Institute on Aging has been invaluable to the quality of life for our family,” Lyon said. “It is my hope that the tremendous care, research and education that it provides will continue to expand on behalf of all Arkansans. We see this donation today as an investment toward that goal.”

Wei, whose medical specialty is geriatrics and cardiovascular disease, said it was fitting that the announcement was made in February, American Heart Month.

“This is truly a gift from the hearts of grateful Arkansans that will support important heart research specifically for aging Arkansans,” Wei said.

She said there are significant differences in the cardiovascular systems of older adults, and treatments must be adapted to their unique physiology.

Tags: , , ,


Speaking of...

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Thursday's open line and the daily video

    Here's the open line and the daily video.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • UPDATE: Ted Suhl gets seven years, $200,000 fine for bribery

    Ted Suhl was sentenced this morning by federal Judge Billy Roy Wilson on four counts of attempting to bribe a state official to help his mental health business supported by Medicaid money. He received 84 months and a $200,000 fine and is to report to prison in early January. He will appeal.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • Question raised on Dallas Cowboy gift to NLR cops

    Blogger Russ Racop raises an interesting question, as he sometimes does, about Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones' gift of free tickets for North Little Rock cops to attend a Dallas Cowboy football game.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Issue 3: blank check

    Who could object to a constitutional amendment "concerning job creation, job expansion and economic development," which is the condensed title for Issue 3 for Arkansas voters on Nov. 8?
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said
  • Ted Suhl loses another bid for new trial; faces stiff sentencing recommendation

    Ted Suhl, the former operator of residential and out-patient mental health services, has lost a second bid to get a new trial on his conviction for paying bribes to influence state Human Services Department policies. Set for sentencing Thursday, Suhl faces a government request for a sentence up to almost 20 years. He argues for no more than 33 months.
  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments



© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation