Friday, July 8, 2011

Two Rivers Bridge dedicated

Posted By on Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 3:52 PM

TESTING THE NEW BRIDGE: At dedication
  • TESTING THE NEW BRIDGE: At dedication
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood helped dedicate the Two Rivers bike/foot bridge over the Little Maumelle River today. Paul Ward provides the accompanying photo and I thought an earlier YouTube clip I found might also be interesting, even if several months old.

Opening of the bridge is several weeks away. All paving is not completed, so be warned.

But already the cranks are bitching about the $5 million or so expenditure. Here's the thing: Just because you don't 1) have a kid in school; 2) ride the trolley; 3) ride a bike; 4) go to a park; 5) check out a book from a library; 6) drive on a city street; 7) draw water from a tap; 8) use a flush toilet IT DOESN'T MEAN that public amenities are not part of the general welfare promoted by government and properly deemed worthy expenditures by our elected representatives. I don't want to live in a medieval universe where only the lords have security and worthy infrastructure.

Build more damn hiking bridges. Dozens of miles of beautiful riverside trails are tourist attractions, health benefits and the kind of outward signs that we are a community that cares about more than selfish interests. If we could only get a few roadblocks out of the way in the neighborhood of the Episcopal Cathedral School and Dillard's headquarters to complete that trail system.

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