Friday, June 15, 2012

Tea Party leader on racist joke — yes, but ....

Posted By on Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 6:42 AM

RICHARD CASTER
  • YAF
  • RICHARD CASTER
Richard Caster, the leader of the Ozark Tea Party, whose June 9 rally in Mountain Home has gone viral on the Internet thanks to a racist joke told by Tea Party leader Inge Marler, has issued a statement to media about the episode.

Caster apologizes for the joke, but says, hey, why don't you write about misbehaving liberals? In short: "Yes, I farted, but you farted, too."

Caster, a youthful Baxter County JP, said Marler is no longer on the Tea Party steering committee. His statement follows on the jump.

BTW: I've seen no comment on the matter by Sen. Missy Irvin (R-ALEC/Mt. View), who attended the rally and sent out a Tweet afterward saying:

Great rally this afternoon for the Ozark Tea Party in Baxter County. Great job @RichardCaster!

(Irvin has declined my requests for comment but has apparently told others she was out of the room when the racist joke was told, wasn't aware of it when she Tweeted and abhors such talk. Lie down with dogs ... )

HISTORICAL NOTE: On the jump, find an excerpt from the memoir of former Arkansas legislator Vada Sheid of Mountain Home. She recounts how a community college proposal was defeated with rumors that it might attract black people to Baxter County.

CASTER STATEMENT

MOUNTAIN HOME — On Saturday, June 9th, the Ozark Tea Party came together to work towards a brighter future for America. Sadly, our vision and message was tainted by an incredibly inappropriate joke told by one of our committee members, Inge Marler.

I was shocked when it was told and as the leader of this organization, I sincerely apologize. Jokes like these have no place in American Politics.

Due to her unfortunate actions, Ms. Marler has agreed to leave the Ozark Tea Party Steering Committee. Ms. Marler did not speak for me or for the Ozark Tea Party when she told that joke. We hold ourselves to a very high standard, and her joke went against what we stand for as a Tea Party. As anyone who has organized an event knows, it is impossible to control every word that is said at the microphone. If I could have stopped her, I would have. Once again, I apologize on behalf of the Ozark Tea Party.

I was very impressed by the media coverage of our Tea Party. I was beginning to think that Investigative Journalism was dead. However, the media has proved me wrong. I would ask the media to continue to do their jobs and to discover the truth wherever it lies.

To help the media out I would like to provide a few examples of stories that have been greatly underreported:

* Occupy Wall Street Rapes http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2012/05/04/occupier-harrison-schultz-lies-about-occupy-rapes

* Barny Frank’s Racist Joke http://articles.nydailynews.com/2012-05-28/news/31879764_1_hoodie-commencement-honorary-degree

* Arkansas Democrat Bill Wisely’s Inappropriate Comment - “I have been racking my little brain trying to figure out how conservatives can be against abortion, birth control and feeding children through food stamps and then it dawned on me. If you primarily sleep with hookers and little boys, unwanted pregnancies really aren’t your first worry.”
http://talkbusiness.net/2012/02/democrats-comments-sink-to-a-new-low/

* Eric Holder’s “Fast and Furious” operation http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jun/07/news/la-pn-eric-holder-grilled-over-fast-and-furious-in-congress-20120607

* Rep. Maxine Waters’ Ethics violation
http://articles.cnn.com/2012-06-08/politics/politics_maxine-waters-inquiry_1_oneunited-bank-million-in-bailout-funds-ethics-panel?_s=PM:POLITICS

I do not highlight these recent indiscretions from leaders on Left to justify the comment of Ms. Marler. Rather, I am pointing them out to encourage accountability in media coverage.

Ms. Marler was wrong in telling that joke and is no longer a part of our organization. She was held accountable. However, Eric Holder, who is the United States Attorney General, used tax dollars to pay for guns that were used to kill American citizens, and he has not been held accountable. Rep. Maxine Waters has not been held accountable. Rep. Barny Frank has not been held accountable. I would argue that given their positions of power, not only their words but the implications on their actions vastly out way the affect of Ms. Marlers’ inappropriate joke.

Lastly, Occupy Wall Street, who has been coined by the media as, “the Left’s answer to the Tea Party,” has not been held accountable for the rapes, vandalism and public defecation, that have occurred during their events, on multiple occasions. I have yet to hear of a Tea Party event where young women were raped, businesses were shut down, and activists were pooping on police cars.

I have no problem with the media holding us accountable. We held ourselves accountable. I just wish they gave the same treatment to everyone.

Richard Caster is the Founder of the Ozark Tea Party in Baxter County, AR. In 2010, he became the youngest person elected to office in the history of the State of Arkansas when he was voted in as Justice of the Peace. Now, at age 21, Caster has been named the Chairman of the Baxter County Legislative Affairs Committee. He is also the Vice Chairman of American Pride PAC and was recently elected to be a delegate for the 2012 Republican National Convention.

FROM VADA SHEID'S "Nothing Personal — Just Politics"

The vote on a local 5-mill property tax to finance consturction was set for July 10. And then I made the biggest mistake of my life.

Leaders of the campaign to promote the college and the tax, who shall remain nameless, were terrrifed over a trend in the country toward two viable political parties. The Republicans were beginning to get their legs under them and the referenced nameless were afraid if I came out really strong for the college, the issue would be politicized and the Republicans might muster enough strength to defeat it.

They came to me, and asked, implored, actually, that I keep a low profile and not campaign locally for the tax. Against all my better judgment, I agreed. After all, I had been in Little Rock and they had been at home, taking the pulse of the people. So I gave them the benefit of the doubt. By the time I caught wind of the whispering campaign against the college, it was too late to counter it.

Rumors were sweeping the back roads and isolated communities that if the college came in, it would be flooded with applications from African-American students, and we'd have to take them all. Vote "No," the whispers said.

The turnout was the heaviest for a special election in Baxter County's history and when the votes were tallied, 1,488 voted for the college and 3,944 voted against.

It was personally humiliating for me to have worked so hard for something so needed and then have it rejected by those it would have benefited most. And all due to rumors — unfounded, deceitful, unchristian, in my estimation, vicious rumors. I was furious. I still am, at those who carried the rumors, but more at myself. I was a fool for letting them talk me into keeping quiet.

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