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Sunday, August 12, 2012

Using tax dollars to teach religion

Posted By on Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 8:12 AM

COMING TO ARK.? Monster myth as science?
  • COMING TO ARK.? Monster myth as science?

COMING TO ARK.? Monster myth as science?
  • COMING TO ARK.? Monster myth as science?
Thanks to Gov. Bobby Jindal (a much heralded recent speaker to Arkansas Republicans), Louisiana is funneling tax money to schools that teach religion (creationism) as science, including the famous example that the Loch Ness monster disproves evolution.

Great editorial on the development in the Baton Rouge newspaper.

The state now has a Jindal-backed law that allows public school science teachers to use supplemental materials in their classrooms in addition to state-approved textbooks.

Guidelines adopted by the state education board ban the promotion of a religious doctrine in the supplemental materials, but without a specific ban on the teaching of creationism.

The state has no intention, apparently, of launching any serious investigation of the Loch Ness monster in school curriculums. Instead, it will pay and pay, for years, and — if students do poorly on science tests at some future date — the state Department of Education might raise the question of why mythology is part of a school’s curriculum.

This is the future of an Arkansas turned solidly red. Don't kid yourself otherwise.

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