Thursday, September 6, 2012

Marijuana is good medicine

Posted By on Thu, Sep 6, 2012 at 10:52 AM

I'd been meaning to mention the growing politicization of the secretary of state's office review of proposed ballot measures. Secretary of State Mark Martin showed again this week — in hinting that he'll personally oppose certification of the medical marijuana initiative as lacking substantively — that he's prepared to move well past simply reviewing petitions for valid signatures. In this case, he'd jump on the side of the fundamentalist religio/political Family Council lobby, where Martin staff attorney Martha Adcock once worked. It's suing to block the law. Others note with some skepticism that Martin has employed the same accounting firm to review signatures that does all the heavy paperwork lifting for Republican political figures and organizations. I doubt that's any sort of a professional conflict, but you do get the idea that Martin is wholly infected by partisanship in office duties, from elections to ballot issues.

Opposition to pot is not necessarily a political winner. Polls over the years have shown a strong libertarian flavor to Arkansans' view of medical use of marijuana — generally favorable, though some recent polling has suggested the latest proposal will have a hard time if it reaches the ballot.

But it's a good time, if nothing else, to talk a little bit about science and medical marijuana (Daily Beast):

Mounting evidence shows ‘cannabinoids’ in marijuana slow cancer growth, inhibit formation of new blood cells that feed a tumor, and help manage pain, fatigue, nausea, and other side effects.

Tough. Take an aspirin and a shot of legal bourbon and hope for the best, including that the religious lobby doesn't come after your booze, too.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (6)

Showing 1-6 of 6

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-6 of 6

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Tom Cotton suggests Dick Cheney as House speaker

    Yes. U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton told Politico he'd like to see Dick Cheny as House speaker.
    • Oct 12, 2015
  • 'How to decimate a city' — a big freeway

    Reporting from around the U.S. continues to illustrate the folly of the Arkansas highway department and construction boosters like the chamber of commerce and Vice Mayor Lance Hines in advocating ever wider freeways through the heart of Little Rock. Syracuse, N.Y., is looking for a better way in a debate remarkably similar to the debate about widening Interstate 30 in Little Rock.
    • Nov 20, 2015
  • Al Gore remembers Dale Bumpers

    Former Vice President Al Gore, a former U.S. Senate colleague of Dale Bumpers, sent a statement on Bumpers' death Friday:
    • Jan 3, 2016

Most Shared

Visit Arkansas

Brant Collins named Group Travel Manager for Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Brant Collins named Group Travel Manager for Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Collins to work toward increasing visitation to Arkansas by groups and promoting the state's appeal

Most Viewed

  • Bathroom bills and the NCAA. Arkansas might fail the championship event test.

    North Carolina may or may not have a "bathroom bill" compromise. Either way, it might not satisfy new rules from the NCAA on ensuring non-discriminatory conditions in places it holds championship events. Arkansas would have a hard time complying.
  • Metroplan sets public hearing on 30 Crossing

    The controversial 30 Crossing project to fatten up seven miles of Interstate 30 from U.S. Highway 67 in North Little Rock to Interstate 530 in Little Rock will once again get a public hearing, thanks to a vote of the Metroplan board Wednesday.
  • Damien Echols joins the anti-execution campaign

    Damien Echols, the West Memphis Three defendant who spent18  years on Death Row before his release, has joined those speaking out against the eight executions planned in April in Arkansas.
  • 1st Amendment takes a lick in bill against 'mass picketing'

    The House completed action today on Sen. Trent Garner's SB 522, intended to discourage "mass picketing," a  piece of legislation similar to many being passed by Republicans lawmakers nationwide to tamp down political demonstrations. The vote was 58-22.
  • Attack on free speech clears House committee

    A bill that would criminalize protest cleared the House Judiciary Committee today on a voice vote. Senate Bill 550 would make "unlawful mass picketing" a Class A misdemeanor.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation