Sunday, September 9, 2012

Fighting for partisan control of the Arkansas legislature

Posted By on Sun, Sep 9, 2012 at 7:38 AM

WORKING TOGETHER: Gov. Beebe on need for bipartisan cooperation.
  • WORKING TOGETHER: Gov. Beebe on need for bipartisan cooperation.
Stephens Media provides today its take on the tough and personal advertising battle between Democrats and Republicans for control of the 2013 legislature.

As ever, Gov. Mike Beebe sounds the pitch-perfect middle ground.

Beebe, who said there are some Republicans he gets along with and some he does not, said he hopes voters understand that politics can be bruising, but that they also want elected officials to work together after the election.

“I think what is getting lost in all this is that regardless of all the outcomes of these races, it’s pretty much a foregone conclusion that the relative split in the General Assembly is going to be close to 50-50, and so that is going to require a significant amount of working together because most appropriation bills, for example, take much more than a simple majority to get them passed,” the governor said.

If the Legislature does not work together, “whoever is identified as not working together will suffer, in my opinion, the wrath of the voters the next time around because Arkansans just despise what is going on in Washington,” he said. “They just despise it.

Can this appealing message work in a world where Republicans are counting on hatred of Barack Obama and hot button issues from gay marriage to abortion to demonize Democrats?

The Stephens article contains an inkling that Republicans have at least some respect for the power of Beebe's appeal. It comes in a quote from Rep. Nate Bell of Mena, a reactionary Republican, enmeshed in the Koch-funded attack machine that is going to spend a million bucks to elect bomb throwers into the majority. You need not follow Bell long to know how rigid his beliefs on everything from evisceration of the tax base to end of environmental regulation. When he says the following, you may be sure he doesn't mean it (former House leader John Burris was just remarking to me Friday about his certainty that a Republican majority would move swiftly and fully to deliver on issue after issue with which I and many moderates disagree). But, for now:

Bell said that, if he wins, putting aside partisan hard feelings after the election may be difficult, but not impossible.

“I think all of us in the public arena, on some level, understand that we still have the responsibility to govern, even with people that have made it very personal,” he said.

Bell, a legislator who refuses to even take questions from critics, has demonstrated no understanding of this to date. You think it will change if he's in the majority? Put down that bong.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas Supreme Court denies rehearing in death penalty challenge, but delays mandate

    The Arkansas Supreme Court today refused to rehear the case denying Death Row inmates information about drugs used by the state in the lethal injection process.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Welspun layoffs: Another example of corporate welfare folly

    Layoffs at the Welspun pipe plant in Little Rock are a reminder of the folly of corporate welfare and the inability of Arkansas to separate itself from global economic forces. See the Fayetteville shale. And keep a watchful eye on that Sun Paper pulp mill proposed near Arkadelphia.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Hamburg bank manager gets 21 months for theft

    Melinda Gwin, 49, of Hamburg has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and ordered to repay $210,875 stolen from the First National Bank of Crossett. She was sentenced in El Dorado federal court, according to a Justice Department news release.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Tackling autism, child by child

    An Arkansas Children's Hospital doctor is testing a new drug that targets one of a host of ailments the highly individual disorder can cause.
  • 1957 all over again

    Last week, the State Board of Education voted to ignore federal courts and allow school district transfers that will encourage segregation.
  • Death penalty lives

    Barely clinging to its flagging life, the death penalty got a merciful reprieve last month from the unlikeliest quarter, the Arkansas Supreme Court.
  • Drinking culture

    Here we go again. At the rate these campus sexual abuse sagas are making news, it's reasonable to ask what college administrators can possibly be thinking about.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation