Saturday, September 15, 2012

Paying for college, the burden shifts to families

Posted By on Sat, Sep 15, 2012 at 6:16 AM

I keep up with the Washington reporting of former colleague Paul Barton, who covers the capital for Gannett newspapers in the South.

He wrote this week on a topic relevant to Arkansas. I suspect you could substitute "Arkansas" to "Tennessee" in most references.

Sen. Lamar Alexander thinks the rise in Medicaid is cutting into the amount states have available for higher education. He proposes a swap by which the federal government takes over all of Medicaid, leaving the states to properly support higher education. Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa said the states were responsible for themselves on higher education and, what's more, somebody had to look after the sick and poor through Medicaid. Barton's story noted that Tennessee, which once covered two-thirds of higher education costs at public institutions, now pays for a third. Families are making up the rest as costs outstrip increases in the cost of living. Harkin notes, too, that lotteries, the go-to state new money gimmick, preys on poor people. From the story:

Earlier in the hearing, there was a discussion of how higher education systems are responding to a financial environment that put more and more of the cost burden on families.

Tennessee students now pay about 67 percent of the cost of their education at public institutions, with the state covering the other third. Go back 20 years, and the state was paying two-thirds, said John G. Morgan, chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents.

A relative decline in state funding combined with rising enrollments are forcing Tennessee institutions to operate in a new way, Morgan said, one that puts an emphasis on “outcomes” — the number of people getting degrees, diplomas and certificates awarded.

Morgan said state planning calls for 43,202 Tennesseans to be earning credentials by 2025, a 60 percent increase over 2010. State officials, he added, view such an increase as critical to economic development, Morgan said.

And population trends, he said, indicate that many more of those students will come from minorities who have traditionally had a harder time financing college.

Programs also have to become more flexible to meet the needs of students who have significant “life commitments” away from campus.

We are having and will continue to have this same discussion here.

Tags: , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • The 'unraveling' of the Clinton Foundation

    Clinton Foundation President Donna Shalala talks to NPR about work underway to 'unravel' the Clinton Foundation in the event of a Hillary Clinton presidency.
    • Aug 24, 2016
  • Expanding horizons through UA basketball

    The Razorback basketball team did more than get in some early work on basketball skills with a trip to Spain, they broadened their cultural horizons, writes Athletic Director Jeff Long in a report on the trip.
    • Aug 24, 2016
  • That time Asa Hutchinson sort of endorsed medical marijuana

    Advocates of medical marijuana are circulating a YouTube video of a 2011 debate at the University of Arkansas between Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, and Asa Hutchinson, not then governor but speaking as a former DEA Administrator and congressman. Hutchinson seemed open to medical use of marijuana.
    • Aug 24, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Rep. Nate Bell blasts adoption story before seeing it; 'rehoming' bill introduced

    Response to our story about rehoming and adoption has been overwhelmingly positive, with one exception. Rep. Nate Bell (R-Mena) has informed me that writing this story makes me the predator and Justin Harris the victim. I'm hellbound, apparently.
    • Mar 4, 2015
  • Maggio fallout figures in major political issues

    The Maggio bribery case has many political implications — from tort reform to campaign finance — and gives Republican-leaning judges a black eye, too.
    • Jan 9, 2015
  • Tom Cotton for president in 2016?

    David Ramsey — yes, that David Ramsey — lays out a scenario in The New Republic about why new U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton should be considered when discussing darkhorse candidacies for president in 2016. He is, after all, an avowed young man in a hurry.
    • Jan 13, 2015

Most Shared

  • Everything new is old when it comes to Arkansas education

    Depressed yet? No? Then read Ernest Dumas' prediction of what's likely to come of a new way of providing state money to higher education — money allocated on performance.
  • AAC: In the black

    The leadership of the Arkansas Arts Center announced at its annual meeting and luncheon today that it has just completed its sixth year in the black, continuing its recovery from a budget black hole created by an expensive blockbuster exhibition, "World of the Pharaohs."

Most Viewed

  • ACLU says hot check court in Sherwood operates as illegal debtors' prison

    The ACLU lawsuit over unconstitutional jailing of people for unpaid fines is over practices in the hot check court operated in Sherwood.
  • Group forms to fight medical marijuana

    A coalition of powerful lobbying groups filed papers with the Arkansas Ethics Commission Tuesday to fight medical marijuana issues headed for the November ballot.
  • Obamacare proves popular in Arkansas

    The state Department of Human Services' monthly report on enrollment in the Private Option health insurance program — Arkansas's version of the Medicaid expansion enabled by Obamacare, or the federal Affordable Care Act — shows even broader popularity than expected, some 300,000 covered against an expected 250,000.
  • Eldridge raps Boozman for Florida trip while ducking debates

    Conner Eldridge, the Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, is knocking Republican opponent, incumbent Sen. John Boozman, for traveling to Florida this week while refusing to meet Eldridge for debate in Arkansas.
  • Meeting set Sept. 13 on Capitol monuments

    Secretary of State Mark Martin has scheduled a meeting Sept. 13 by the Capitol Arts and Grounds Commission to consider monuments proposed for the Capitol — a Ten Commandments monument authorized by the legislature and a Satanic Temple proposal. Others may emerge.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation