Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Mitt Romney and the Republican war on working people

Posted By on Tue, Sep 18, 2012 at 6:32 AM

The blowback has been huge, understandably, to the undercover video that captured Mitt Romney telling rich backers what he really thinks about poor, working Americans.

He rushed to explain his statement that almost half of Americans think they are "victims" was "not elegantly" stated. But it was nothing but a rare moment of candor for Mitt Romney and a stark illustration of his — and his party's — understanding and empathy for the plight of ordinary people.

And here's a primer on Mitt Romney's 47 percent. Most pay payroll taxes. A significant number, benefitting from the earned income tax credit, will move to the tax-paying rolls within two years and many are elderly, drawing Social Security benefits they earned from payroll deductions. Deadbeats all.

Romney and Co., of course, have sold this myth to a goodly number of the very people he describes as predatory deadbeats who believe in entitlements — think the lowest paid members of the military, for example; pensioners, and others. His cold dismissal of them should cause some second thoughts, but faith is a powerful thing. Facts, not so much.

UPDATE: Good analysis from Ezra Klein on Mitt Romney's war on the non-millionaires.

ALSO: A conservative writer for National Review explains further that a significant number of the deadbeats don't pay federal income tax thanks to the child credit, a pro-family deduction that Republicans favored but wipes out tax liability for many low-income workers.

And speaking of facts, more video of the clueless Mitt Romney, in which he asserts that middle income in America means you earn $200,000 to $250,000. Yes, really. Income sufficient to put you in the top 1 or 2 percent of all of Arkansas is "middle income."

It's really not a long walk from the clueless Mitt Romney to the Koch Billionaire-inspired legislative effort sweeping the country to suppress the votes of poor people, as Voter ID laws would do. In their hearts, Republicans don't think poor minorities are qualified to vote, so they've come up with a non-existent claim of in-person voter impersonation to justify the ID laws that will disenfranchise millions of American.

Don't believe it? This is a MUST READ. A Washington Post reporter examines up close the bureaucratic maze that attends the new Pennsylvania voter ID law, which a leading Republican sponsor has already boasted would deliver the state to Romney through vote suppression. Follow the tortured path required for a 54-year-old woman, a voter since 19, to obtain a photo ID. The bureacratic maze is working as Republicans intended:

Perhaps 100,000 registered voters lack the right ID, although no one knows for sure; estimates have ranged from 1 to 11 percent of 8.3 million registered voters. Through Sept. 11, the state had issued 7,548 of the free non-driver IDs for voting, said PennDOT spokeswoman Jan McKnight, and 579 of the cards of last resort, 343 of those in Philadelphia — and one of those facilitated by McKnight herself, to the father of Jim Cramer, after the CNBC host complained via Twitter last Wednesday that his dad couldn’t get ID.

Tags: , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (39)

Showing 1-39 of 39

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-39 of 39

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Rapert joins 'Declaration of Dependence' on God and Bible

    A full page ad in Sunday's New York Times, signed by 21 religious figures, was styled as a "Declaration of Dependence Upon God and His Holy Bible." Sen. Jason Rapert, who's gone full-time into the preaching business, was a signatory along with the likes of faux historian David Barton, Kenneth Copeland, James Dobson and Creflo Dollar.
    • Sep 26, 2016
  • Broadway Bridgeageddon set for Wednesday morning

    The Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department has scheduled a "closing ceremony" for the Broadway Bridge at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, 45 minutes after the bridge is closed for six months or so of work to tear down the old structure and replace it.
    • Sep 26, 2016
  • Unusual alliance forming against amendment to limit nursing home damages

    Secure Arkansas, a rabid anti-immigrant voice among other issues, has come out against the amendment to make it just about impossible to sue nursing homes, doctors, hospitals and other medical care providers The nursing home lobby-driven amendment would cap damages as low as $250,000 and also place an arbitrary limit on attorney fees.
    • Sep 26, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Who's harming women?

    Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is an Arkansas Republican. Thus, like the governor and the Republican-majority legislature, she intends to do everything she can to deny women comprehensive medical care, particularly abortion.
  • New normal

    No two presidential candidates since polling began have run up negatives as massive as those of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, who yet won their parties' nominations easily. "What gives?" may be the biggest political mystery in history.
  • Additional rape charges filed against Conway doctor

    Special Prosecutor Jason Barrett has added 11 more victims to two others alleging rape by Dr. Robert Rook of Conway.
  • Big Dam Bridge 100 brings big damn complaint about celebrity rider Hincapie

    The Big Dam Bridge 100 is this weekend and one dedicated biker isn't happy about a celebrity rider, admitted doper George Hincapie.

Most Viewed

  • Rapert joins 'Declaration of Dependence' on God and Bible

    A full page ad in Sunday's New York Times, signed by 21 religious figures, was styled as a "Declaration of Dependence Upon God and His Holy Bible." Sen. Jason Rapert, who's gone full-time into the preaching business, was a signatory along with the likes of faux historian David Barton, Kenneth Copeland, James Dobson and Creflo Dollar.
  • Drug companies fight medical marijuana

    Disclosure about financing of the anti-medical marijuana campaign in Arkansas is so far lacking, but it's no secret what's happened in other states — pharmaceutical companies have worked to defeat medical marijuana laws because they create (safer) competition.
  • Unusual alliance forming against amendment to limit nursing home damages

    Secure Arkansas, a rabid anti-immigrant voice among other issues, has come out against the amendment to make it just about impossible to sue nursing homes, doctors, hospitals and other medical care providers The nursing home lobby-driven amendment would cap damages as low as $250,000 and also place an arbitrary limit on attorney fees.
  • Broadway Bridgeageddon set for Wednesday morning

    The Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department has scheduled a "closing ceremony" for the Broadway Bridge at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, 45 minutes after the bridge is closed for six months or so of work to tear down the old structure and replace it.
  • The debate eve open line

    The Sunday open lines includes some rumination, not happy, about tomorrow night's presidential debate.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation