Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Tim Griffin truth squad debunks his regulation claim

Posted By on Wed, Sep 19, 2012 at 8:54 AM

THERE HE GOES AGAIN: Constituent nails Rep. Griffin on supposed study of regulation.
  • THERE HE GOES AGAIN: Constituent nails Rep. Griffin on supposed study of regulation.
So much dishonesty, so few resources to combat it. It's the story of the Republican talk machine.

So I enjoyed Little Rock lawyer John Wesley Hall's one-man crusade against dishonest electioneering from U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin. It started with this Griffin e-mail back in July:

This week, the House will vote on the Red Tape Reduction and Small Business Job Creation Act (H.R. 4078), which puts a moratorium on new regulations that would cost the economy $100 million or more until the unemployment rate falls to six percent or below.

I'm the lead sponsor of this legislation, and I've put together a video explaining what it does and why it's necessary. The government's Small Business Administration estimates that current regulations already cost $1.75 trillion every year and add $10,585 in overhead per employee.

After you watch the video, please take the poll! I'd like to know what you think.

Now I'll let Hall speak for himself, in a letter he sent to Griffin's office this week.

On July 24th you sent me the attached [above] email stating that the SBA says that the regulatory cost in the US is $10,585 per employee. I challenged your figures in an email right back.

On Monday, September 17th, almost two months later, you responded with the Crain and Crain study, which the SBA says right on the front that it does not endorse but you said it did. So, I Googled the authors and I find this, an article that states that the methodology is faulty and even the persons whose figures are used in it challenge it. See also Daily Kos.

It is not the SBA. It is a fatally faulty study. Under the normal standards for admissibility of expert opinion, it fails, just like the plaintiff's expert in the Jeffers case [a voting rights challenge supported by Arkansas Republican politicians] did, according to Republican judges Lavenski Smith, Susan Wright, and Leon Holmes, at 18-19.

Therefore, as a constituent you have to represent even though you know I couldn't ever vote for you because of Florida in 2000 and your typical "follow Boenher and Cantor through the Gates of Hell [or off the Fiscal Cliff] no matter what" because you have no independent thoughts, I suggest you at least clarify that the SBA does not endorse this study and many others find its methodology completely faulty.

Rather than put in a disclaimer, you could reject it entirely. But that's not what Republicans do. The only truthful thing out of Romney's mouth in this election since 2009 has been what he tells his rich donors caught on tape. I don't expect you to be different. Surprise us.

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