Saturday, September 22, 2012

Does Paul Ryan ever tell the truth?

Posted By on Sat, Sep 22, 2012 at 7:22 PM

marathonman.jpg
  • rootriversiren
It's well established that Paul Ryan can't be trusted on facts that are important — the budget, taxes, policy.

But the record of his dishonesty, or let us charitably say failure to attend to details, continues to grow.

From today's New York Times:

* MARATHON MAN: Mayo Clinic doc doubts the below-3-hour marathoner's claim on his body fat index.

* DON'T LIKE TAXES? DON'T PAY THEM: Turns out Ryan initially made a tiny little $61,000 error in reporting his income for 2011, a fact lost in the reporting on Mitt Romney's income tax funny business.

In an amended return also released Friday, Representative Paul D. Ryan, Mr. Romney’s running mate, disclosed that he and his wife had initially failed to report $61,122 in income from 2011. He said the failure was inadvertent. The change raised their total income to $323,416 and increased their taxes by $19,917 to $64,674, or 20 percent of adjusted gross income.

They owed a penalty of $59 for the original underpayment. The Ryans explained that they had overlooked their income from the Prudence Little Living Trust. Mrs. Little, who died in 2010, was Mrs. Ryan’s mother.

A man who'll lie/misstate the facts repeatedly about his marathon time, his body fat index, his income and the federal budget will FILL IN THE BLANK.

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