Friday, October 5, 2012

Republican extremists, in their own words

Posted By on Fri, Oct 5, 2012 at 11:33 AM

SLAVERY HAD ITS PLUSES: Republican Rep. Jon  Hubbard.
  • SLAVERY HAD ITS PLUSES: Republican Rep. Jon Hubbard.
Extremism is no vice among Arkansas Republicans. And, no, I'm not talking about neo-Confederate Republican Rep. Loy Mauch, who once tried to have Abraham Lincoln's bust removed from the Hot Springs Convention Center.

There's also Rep. Jon Hubbard of Jonesboro, famously unhinged, who's put some of his choicest thoughts on paper in a book available on Amazon, “Letters to the Editor: Confessions of a Frustrated Conservative.” I'd heard a lot about this book and was talking to Lindsey Millar this morning about ordering a copy. But Michael Cook at Talk Business has already written about some choice excerpts. I confess that publicizing thoughts such as these might only serve to encourage the Republican voter base. But the truth will set someone free. Excerpts selected by Cook and others:

hubbard.JPG

Slavery was good for black people:

“… the institution of slavery that the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people may actually have been a blessing in disguise. The blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would someday be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the Earth.” (Pages 183-89)

If you think slavery was bad, you should have seen Africa:

African Americans must “understand that even while in the throes of slavery, their lives as Americans are likely much better than they ever would have enjoyed living in sub-Saharan Africa.”

“Knowing what we know today about life on the African continent, would an existence spent in slavery have been any crueler than a life spent in sub-Saharan Africa?” (Pages 93 and 189)

Black people are ignorant:

“Wouldn’t life for blacks in America today be more enjoyable and successful if they would only learn to appreciate the value of a good education?” (Page 184)

Integration was bad for white people

“… one of the stated purposes of school integration was to bring black students up to a level close to that of white students. But, to the great disappointment of everyone, the results of this theory worked exactly in reverse of its intended purpose, and instead of black students rising to the educational levels previously attained by white students, the white students dropped to the level of black students. To make matters worse the lack of discipline and ambition of black students soon became shared by their white classmates, and our educational system has been in a steady decline ever since.” (Page 27)

It's basically hopeless.

“… will it ever become possible for black people in the United States of America to firmly establish themselves as inclusive and contributing members of society within this country?” (Page 187)

Immigration is bad.

..the immigration issue, both legal and illegal... will lead to planned wars or extermination. Although now this seems to be barbaric and uncivilized, it will at some point become as necessary as eating and breathing." (Page 9)

Don't forget Nazi Germany.

"American Christians are assuming a similar stance as did the citizens of Germany during Hitler's rise to power." (Page 158)

Any wonder why the Arkansas Republican Party endorses mass mailings that emphasize the evil being done to America by black men, particularly the one in the White House or one dressed up like a doctor? FYI: Hubbard has a great Democratic opponent, church stalwart businessman Harold Copenhaver of Jonesboro.

godslaw.jpg

FUQUAS WAY: Another weird Republican, Charles Fuqua.
  • FUQUA'S WAY: Another weird Republican, Charles Fuqua.
I need to dig now into the book, "God's Law: The Only Political Solution," by another Republican candidate, Charles Fuqua of Batesville. Another wackjob. He's running against another solid Democrat Rep. James McLean. Highlighting his thoughts, again, might be a bad idea given the way things are going. Fuqua's God, for one good example, doesn't want anything to do with helping poor folks get insurance coverage in the federal Affordable Care Act. Fuqua served previously in the legislature from Springdale.

I'll have some book excerpts shortly, but this is from his own website:

Q. Do believe that the law of the U.S. is inconsistent with the principles stated in the Ten commandments?

A. Abortion, failing to use the death penalty, Socialism, graduated income tax, and our entire economic system is in violation of God’s law.

Again. This might be a winning ticket. But here I stand. I can do no other than report it.

UPDATE: I have some excerpts from Fuqua to add, but they're deserving of their own special attention. Evict all Muslims from the U.S.; monetary policy violates the Ten Commandments, etc. Check it out here.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (38)

Showing 1-38 of 38

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-38 of 38

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
    • Apr 20, 2017
  • Death Row inmates argue to keep stay of execution in place; urge 8th Circuit not to 'rush' analysis

    Early this morning, attorneys for nine Death Row inmates, filed an argument with the 8th United States Court of Appeals contesting the state's effort to override Judge Kristine Baker's order Saturday that halted executions scheduled this month.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • Federal judge denies execution stay for Don Davis but larger stay continues

    Don Davis, who's been moved to the killing facility of the state prison for killing tonight at 7 p.m. if a stay of execution is lifted in another federal suit, sought a stay in another federal court Sunday, but the request was denied.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
  • Art bull

    "God, I hate art," my late friend The Doctor used to say.
  • Not justice

    The strongest, most enduring calls for the death penalty come from those who feel deeply the moral righteousness of "eye-for-an-eye" justice, or retribution. From the depths of pain and the heights of moral offense comes the cry, "The suffering you cause is the suffering you shall receive!" From the true moral insight that punishment should fit the crime, cool logic concludes, "Killers should be killed." Yet I say: retribution yes; death penalty no.
  • Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

    Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.
  • The Ledell Lee execution thread

    Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.

Visit Arkansas

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Chuck Haralson and Ken Smith were inducted into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame during the 43rd annual Governor’s Conference on Tourism

Most Viewed

  • Lee's lawyer writes about executed man's last hours

    Lee Short, the lawyer for Ledell Lee, the man Arkansas put to death just before midnight last night, posted on Facebook the following letter of thanks for personal support and a bit about Lee's last hours, distributing his possessions and talking to family.
  • State spends $30,000 drug testing TANF recipients for drugs, nabs 2.

    Think Progress reported yesterday that 13 states spent a total of $1.3 million to perform 2,826 drug tests on persons seeking funds from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Of those nearly 3,000 people required to pee in a cup to get assistance for their families, 369 tested positive.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

Slideshows

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation