Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Dianne Curry wins Little Rock School Board runoff

Posted By on Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 8:23 PM

Incumbent Little Rick School Board member Dianne Curry has won her runoff with Tanya Dixon for another three-year term on the school board from Zone 7.

With all precincts reporting, the Pulaski Election Commission had Curry winning 333-262, or with almost 55 percent of the vote.

With extremely low turnout in the only race contested south i\of the river, Curry benefitted from a comparatively heavy vote in Otter Creek (more than 250 votes I was told). That neighborhod gave her a wide margin that left her just two votes short of an outright win in the overall initial voting. Curry enjoyed Little Rock teacher union support. Civil rights lawyer John Walker, a powerful figure in district affairs, supported Dixon, despite being a key backer of Curry in her first race six years ago.

UPDATE: Indeed, precinct results show Curry, who won by 71 votes, had an 80-vote lead at the two precincts that vote at Henderson Methodist, which serves Otter Creek voters.

Maumelle also has an election today on bond issues for two road and a fire station project. The two Counts Massie Road projects trailed in early voting while the fire station was ahead.

UPDATE: The full vote turned things around in Maumelle. Voters approved all three bond-backed construction projects:

* The Crystal Hill-Counts Massie project: 1,090-915
* Crystal Hill work and utility extension: 1,111-895
* Fire station: 1,266-742.

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