Monday, October 15, 2012

Republican money continues for Hubbard

Posted By on Mon, Oct 15, 2012 at 10:05 AM

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State Rep. Jon (Slavery had its redeeming features) Hubbard has filed a monthly financial disclosure statement.

It reports more money from Republican officeholders than I'd reported previously. They pre-date (mostly in mid-September) the most recent round of international attention to Hubbard's incendiary book, but they by no means predate his rich record of extremist rhetoric.

Contributions include:

$200 from House Republican Leader Bruce Westerman

$200 from Republican state Rep. Ann Clemmer

$100 from Bruce Campbell, Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Darr's chief of staff

$100 from Republican state Rep. Jeremy Gillam

$150 from Republican state Rep. Debra Hobbs

$400 from Republican state Rep. Terry Rice, who'll count on Hubbard's vote for House speaker if a Republican majority allows a revote on the House's earlier choice of Democratic Rep. Darrin Williams.

$250 from Republican Rep. Gary Deffenbaugh

$250 from Republican Rep. Lane Jean

$250 from the Strong Arkansas PAC, Republican Lt. Gov. Mark Darr's personal PAC.

$250 from Koch Industries of Wichita (erroneously listed as Kosh Industries.) This is the empire of the billionaire Koch Brothers who are also funding other efforts, notably Americans for Prosperity, working independently for a Republican majority.

Since no Republican has yet withdrawn his or her endorsement of Hubbard or demanded that money be returned, I'm doubting I'll see a flurry of news releases on these latest Republican supporters' jump from Hubbard's campaign. But they are worth remembering when Republican leadership says the sentiments expressed by Hubbard, Charlies Fuqua, Loy Mauch and others are disavowed by other Republicans. Do you give money to people you disavow? Do you endorse their election?

BELATED PS: Jay Barth wrote brilliantly for us this week about the Republican leadership's moral imperative to stand up against crankdom and the difficulty they have in candidate quality.

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