Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Election update — Obama wins; Arkansas legislature turns Republican

Posted By on Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 9:50 PM

A break from TV gives me a chance to say:

Without Florida, Mitt Romney loses and Florida isn't looking good.

UPDATE: It's over. Ohio goes Obama and so goes the nation. A historic victory on a night when Arkansas will make history of its own by not edging, but leaping into the Republican column with total control of U.S. House seats and what appear to be huge margins in the legislature.

Republicans will sweep the Arkansas congressional seats. Moral victory for Herb Rule, who appears to be heading to a big win in incumbent Congressman Tim Griffin's home county. Maybe Griffin should move to Benton, Conway or Searcy, which overwhelmingly supported him and will give him a comfortable victory overall. He never legislates with Pulaski interests in mind. Repudiation at home isn't a great springboard for his 2014 Senate race.

The Arkansas legislative final tally is a long way off, but a Republican majority is a certainty. House staff members will be typing up resumes. Republicans may sweep most of of the contested Senate races. Gov. Mike Beebe will be figuring out how to govern a legislative majority he tried to thwart. Among the outcomes: Barbara Graves has conceded her hard-fought race against Republican Allen Kerr. Rep. Jim Nickels, a progressive Democrat, narrowly survived a Republican challenger from Sherwood. Some other Pulaski legislative races are still up in the air, but Sen. David Johnson will handily defeat a Tea Party opponent. Mark Lowery apparently has defeated Kelly Halstead for a Maumelle House seat. The Barry Hyde-Jane English Senate race in North Little Rock is tight, but with Republican English ahead. Tight, too, are Senate races in Northeast and Southeast Arkansas.

RUNOFF: It's likely for North Little Rock mayor, where Tracy Steele is leading 48-40 Joe Smith, the designated heir to Pat Hays. If Steele doesn't top 50 percent (and with 98.5 percent of the vote counted it doesn't seem likely), the runoff will be the Tuesday after Thanksgiving.

LITTLE ROCK CITY BOARD: Gene Fortson edged ahead of Willard Proctor to apparenlty retain his Little Rock City Board seat with a 46-40 edge. The minor candidate who picked up 13 percent might have saved Fortson's rear in the no-runoff race.

STATEWIDE BALLOT ISSUES: The highway sales tax is comfortably ahead; opponents are beating medical marijuana 52-48 (Pulaski voters are approving it heavily); Issue 2, a corporate welfare scheme, is being defeated with about a third of the vote in.

Favorite

Comments (22)

Showing 1-22 of 22

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-22 of 22

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas Supreme Court denies rehearing in death penalty challenge, but delays mandate

    The Arkansas Supreme Court today refused to rehear the case denying Death Row inmates information about drugs used by the state in the lethal injection process.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Welspun layoffs: Another example of corporate welfare folly

    Layoffs at the Welspun pipe plant in Little Rock are a reminder of the folly of corporate welfare and the inability of Arkansas to separate itself from global economic forces. See the Fayetteville shale. And keep a watchful eye on that Sun Paper pulp mill proposed near Arkadelphia.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Hamburg bank manager gets 21 months for theft

    Melinda Gwin, 49, of Hamburg has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and ordered to repay $210,875 stolen from the First National Bank of Crossett. She was sentenced in El Dorado federal court, according to a Justice Department news release.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Tackling autism, child by child

    An Arkansas Children's Hospital doctor is testing a new drug that targets one of a host of ailments the highly individual disorder can cause.
  • 1957 all over again

    Last week, the State Board of Education voted to ignore federal courts and allow school district transfers that will encourage segregation.
  • Death penalty lives

    Barely clinging to its flagging life, the death penalty got a merciful reprieve last month from the unlikeliest quarter, the Arkansas Supreme Court.
  • Drinking culture

    Here we go again. At the rate these campus sexual abuse sagas are making news, it's reasonable to ask what college administrators can possibly be thinking about.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: As the campaign turns...

    • From now to Nov. 8 is a long, long ways off. Lots of polls will…

    • on July 24, 2016
  • Re: The Ted Suhl trial, day 4: A problem for the prosecution

    • The judge denied all motions to show all of what the blog above stated.- […

    • on July 24, 2016
  • Re: Open line

    • Clearly the bigots are feeling empowered by the Trump hate. David Duke announced for U.S…

    • on July 24, 2016

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation