Saturday, November 17, 2012

Pay boost proposed for UA athletic director Jeff Long

Posted By on Sat, Nov 17, 2012 at 5:55 AM

GOOD YEAR: UA Athletic Director Jeff Long.
  • GOOD YEAR: UA Athletic Director Jeff Long.
University of Arkansas Chancellor David Gearhart, telling Athletic Director Jeff Long he was "very appreciative of your outstanding leadership," has proposed significant enhancements in his existing contract and an extension through 2017. The deal must be approved by the UA Board of Trustees.

It would move Long to $900,000 a year, which KFSM reported would put him in the top 10 nationally and 3rd in the SEC, according to a USA Today survey. Long has been mentioned frequently as a contender for similar jobs at other universities.

Long's base pay would be increased from $450,000 to $500,000 annually July 1; the Razorback Foundation would kick in an additional $250,000 for "personal services" and he'd also receive $150,000 at the completion of each year, for a total of $900,000 annually. He'd also have the potential for receiving $250,000 more for achieving performance incentives (winning teams, academic success of athletes, etc.).

He also will get a $50,000 bonus this year "in recognition of your outstanding performance and the additional duties you are performing this year."

Here's Gearhart's letter to Long.

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