Monday, December 3, 2012

Arkansas spends $431 million per year on corporate welfare

Posted By on Mon, Dec 3, 2012 at 11:31 AM

This impressively researched interactive map from the New York Times examines the $90 billion in business incentives provided by cities, counties and states across the country. Arkansas spends $431 million per year on business incentives, which amounts to nine cents per dollar of the state budget. Arkansas spends considerably less than most of its neighbors.

The map allows you to see which companies benefit the most and how much they're getting, as well as the state incentives programs that dole out the most money.

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