Thursday, December 6, 2012

Appeals court orders resentencing for Randeep Mann

Posted By on Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 12:58 PM

Randeep Mann, the Russellville doctor convicted of responsibility for a bomb that nearly killed Trent Pierce of West Memphis, the chairman of the state Medical Board, should be resentenced, a federal appeals court ruled today.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said that Mann, who had been sentenced to life, shouldn't have received an enhanced sentence based on allegations he ordered the assault of an inmate. That detail, which never came up in Mann's trial, shouldn't have been referenced in a pre-sentencing report, the court said.

The court also said that Mann's two weapons convictions amounted to double jeopardy and ordered one of them tossed.

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