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Monday, December 31, 2012

More guns: A recipe for safety or more deaths?

Posted By on Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 7:08 AM

GUN GROWTH: Soon the numbers to top population.
  • GUN GROWTH: Soon the numbers to top population.
Mother Jones posts an article sure to set the NRA gun nuts like Asa! abuzz:

In the fierce debate that always follows the latest mass shooting, it's an argument you hear frequently from gun rights promoters: If only more people were armed, there would be a better chance of stopping these terrible events. This has plausibility problems—what are the odds that, say, a moviegoer with a pack of Twizzlers in one pocket and a Glock in the other would be mentally prepared, properly positioned, and skilled enough to take out a body-armored assailant in a smoke- and panic-filled theater? But whether you believe that would happen is ultimately a matter of theory and speculation. Instead, let's look at some facts gathered in a two-month investigation by Mother Jones.

In the wake of the slaughters this summer at a Colorado movie theater and a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, we set out to track mass shootings in the United States over the last 30 years. We identified and analyzed 62 of them, and one striking pattern in the data is this: In not a single case was the killing stopped by a civilian using a gun. Moreover, we found that the rate of mass shootings has increased in recent years—at a time when America has been flooded with millions of additional firearms and a barrage of new laws has made it easier than ever to carry them in public. And in other recent rampages in which armed civilians attempted to intervene, they not only failed to stop the shooter but also were gravely wounded or killed.

More guns. More killing. Yes, I know: Correlation is not causation.

Bill Keller of the New York Times draws the obvious Swiftian conclusion this morning for the NRA's dandy new PR campaign for more guns everywhere, particularly in schools: Why not arm every kid, too?

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