Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Former state senator lands state agency job

Posted By on Wed, Jan 16, 2013 at 6:03 PM

RANDY LAVERTY: Lands state job.
  • RANDY LAVERTY: Lands state job.
One door closes for a term-limited legislator, another door opens. And it comes with a taxpayer paycheck and state retirement benefits in this case.

Former Sen. Randy Laverty has been hired as new commissioner of Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, a division of the Career Education Department headed by Bill Walker, himself a former state senator. Both are Democrats.

Laverty has a background in human services and was a hired director (don't call the job a lobby position) for the Developmental Disabilities Provider Association, an interest group for agencies largely backed by public funds.

The news release follows. It didn't mention the pay Laverty will receive. I've sent a query. Former Commissioner Robert Trevino made $109,000 before he stepped down to a lower level job in Walker's department following a tough audit of the agency. Randy Parker came out of retirement to be interim director in October. UPDATE: Laverty also will make $109,000.

NEWS RELEASE

Arkansas Department of Career Education Director Bill Walker today announced the appointment of Randy Laverty, former state senator, as commissioner of Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS). Laverty will assume the position February 3. He will be formally introduced to ARS staff January 18.

“I am delighted that Senator Laverty has chosen to continue his commitment to public service by assuming the commissioner position for ARS,” Walker said. “He brings to the position a broad range of experience and leadership that will enhance and expand the services provided by ARS.”

Laverty takes over the helm from Randy Parker, who came out of retirement in October to serve as interim commissioner. “Mr. Parker’s dedication to ARS is exemplary, and I want to thank him for guiding ARS through these past four months,” Walker said.

Laverty began his career of public service in 1975 as the Newton County director for the Department of Human Services, Division of Social Services. As county director, he was responsible for economic and medical programs, as well as children and family services. In 1982, he was named assistant director of field operations for the Department of Human Services, Division of Social Services, and was responsible for all social services programs in 17 counties. In 1985, he assumed the position of assistant director for the Department of Human Services, Division of County Operations, and served in that position for eight years.

Laverty also served as executive director of the Developmental Disabilities Provider Association from 2001 to 2009 and is currently the association’s resource development director, a position he has held since 2009.

He served 16 years in the Arkansas Legislature, in the House of Representatives from 1995 to 2001 and in the Senate from 2003 until January 14, 2013. Among his many leadership roles, he served as chair of the Joint Audit Committee; as chair of House Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee; and as vice-chair of the Senate Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee. He also served on the Joint Budget Committee, where he chaired several subcommittees, including the Personnel, Classification and Compensation Subcommittee.

Laverty holds a bachelor of science degree from Arkansas Tech University. He and his wife, Virginia, have three children and four grandchildren.

Tags: , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
    • Apr 20, 2017
  • Death Row inmates argue to keep stay of execution in place; urge 8th Circuit not to 'rush' analysis

    Early this morning, attorneys for nine Death Row inmates, filed an argument with the 8th United States Court of Appeals contesting the state's effort to override Judge Kristine Baker's order Saturday that halted executions scheduled this month.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • Federal judge denies execution stay for Don Davis but larger stay continues

    Don Davis, who's been moved to the killing facility of the state prison for killing tonight at 7 p.m. if a stay of execution is lifted in another federal suit, sought a stay in another federal court Sunday, but the request was denied.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • The plight of the refugees: Dark episodes in Arkansas

    Ernest Dumas reaches into history, some personal, for moments in Arkansas's view of refugees. It was brought to mind by the current crisis in Europe and the political divisions over whether the U.S. should respond to the needs of the displaced.
    • Sep 22, 2015
  • UPDATE: Judge rethinking punishment for attorneys in insurance settlement case

    Judge P.K. Holmes is rethinking whether lawyers deserve punishment in a class action lawsuit against an insurance company abruptly pulled from his court after pending more than a year and then quickly settled in a state court.
    • Jun 24, 2016
  • Democrats name new House minority leader

    Rep. Michael John Gray of Augusta has been elected leader of the House Democratic Caucus, the minority party. He succeeds Rep. Eddie Armstrong of North Little Rock. He's a farmer and small business owner.
    • Sep 25, 2015

Most Shared

  • Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

    Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.
  • The Ledell Lee execution thread

    Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.

Visit Arkansas

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Chuck Haralson and Ken Smith were inducted into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame during the 43rd annual Governor’s Conference on Tourism

Most Viewed

  • The Jack Jones, Marcel Williams execution thread

    The Arkansas Department of Correction is planning for the first double execution in the U.S. in 16 years tonight. Jack Jones, 52,  and Marcell Williams, 46, are scheduled to die by lethal injection. They would be the second and third prisoners put to death as part of a hurried schedule Governor Hutchinson set in advance of the state's supply of one of the three drugs used in the execution protocol expiring on April 30.
  • Lee's lawyer writes about executed man's last hours

    Lee Short, the lawyer for Ledell Lee, the man Arkansas put to death just before midnight last night, posted on Facebook the following letter of thanks for personal support and a bit about Lee's last hours, distributing his possessions and talking to family.
  • Legislature set to tackle changes to "Arkansas Works" Medicaid expansion in special session

    The governor is expected to call the special session to get legislative approval of his proposed alterations to the private option (now known as "Arkansas Works"). Here's what to look for.
  • Supreme Court hears arguments in case that led to stays for two Arkansas death row inmates

    The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in an appeal yesterday that asks the court to rule that indigent criminal defendants are entitled to an independent expert witness. The case, McWilliams v. Dunn, goes back to the 1984 capital murder conviction of James McWilliams, who raped and murdered a woman in Tuscaloosa, Ala., during a robbery. But the high court's decision will also directly affect the fates of Don Davis and Bruce Ward, Arkansas death row prisoners who were slated to die this month, but given a reprieve by the Arkansas Supreme Court, which issued a stay in each execution, pending the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in McWilliams in June.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

Slideshows

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation