Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Voter suppression passes

Posted By on Wed, Mar 13, 2013 at 1:01 PM

The House Rules Committee said today that Sen. Bryan King's bill to require voter ID did not require a supermajority vote in the Senate, as Rep. Jim Nickels had argued. The ruling sends the bill back to the House, where it's sure to pass.

UPDATE: Our correspondent, James Owen, reports it was a party-line vote, 8-7, to send the bill on to the House.

UPDATE II: The word on Twitter is that a House recess minutes ago was for Republicans because they didn't have enough votes. Recess is over and the bill is before the House. Rep. Stephen Meeks is presenting it and, like every other time the bill has been presented, Hudson Hallum's name has been invoked. Even though his case had nothing to do with voter impersonation.

Nice line of questioning from Rep. David Kizzia (D-Malvern), who noted that a concealed carry permit is an acceptable form of ID under the bill. Doesn't that go against the spirit of the concealed carry permit exception from the FOIA? he asked. Why would we ask gun owners to reveal their identities?

Rep. John Walker offers an emotional stemwinder against the bill. "Most of you here don't have my color or my history. You've never been deprived the right the vote. You've never endured an impediment to voting."

Passing the bill would send a message to "black legislators that we are not really your peers and our people are not your peers," he said.

Rep. David Meeks tweets, "More inappropriate remarks by Rep John Walker from the well. This is 2013."

Rep. Darrin Williams takes to the well to speak against the bill, citing his mother, who lived until she was 86 and never had a driver's license, as someone would have been among those disenfranchised. He paired that with a lot of statistics, like that African Americans are 20 percent less likely to have an ID. "The right to vote is more than a privilege. It truly is a right."

Rep. Ann Clemmer takes to the floor to lament that Democrats call the bill a voter suppression tactic. "When I came before you with another controversial bill, I didn't call those who didn't support it baby killers."

The bill passes on a party line vote, 51-44. Shameful. Correction, Rep. Walls McCrary of Lonoke joined the Republicans. Here's the vote tally.

UPDATE: Apparently, McCrary changed his vote when the vote was sounded.

Tags: , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (51)

Showing 1-50 of 51

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-50 of 51

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Debtors' Prison Edition

    This week, Max and Lindsey talk about a Sherwood District Court that operates as an illegal debtors’ prison, according to a new ACLU federal lawsuit; Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner’s views on residency requirements, the Little Rock School District and a wide range of other topics; and then they do a quick run through some other topics including the imminent closure of the Broadway Bridge and the selection of Leslie Rutledge’s daddy to head up the Election Commission.
    • Aug 26, 2016
  • A plan for Arkansas to get more out of the money it spends on corrections

    Arkansas's prison population is among the fastest growing in the country. The state now spends more than half of a billion dollars on corrections, a 68 percent increase since 2004, and our prison population, which increased by 21 percent between 2012 and 2016, is expected to rise by another 19 percent between 2016 and 2023 to 21,345. Those were the facts and projections Justice Center, a project of the national nonprofit Council of State Governments, reminded people of yesterday before presenting criminal justice reform proposals.
    • Aug 26, 2016
  • Arkansas criminal justice reform proposal due today

    We'll get a good sense of what criminal justice reform legislation might look like in the 2017 General Assembly later today — as well as some potential stumbling blocks to its passage. Justice Center, an offshoot of the national nonprofit Council of State Governments, will offer policy recommendations to the Legislative Criminal Justice Oversight Task Force this afternoon at the Arkansas Association of Counties conference.
    • Aug 25, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

Most Viewed

  • Legislature subpoenas judge to testify about child custody decisions.

    The Legislative Joint Performance Review Committee has subpoenaed Circuit Judge Patricia James, who handles juvenile cases in Pulaski and Perry County, to testify to explain her child custody decisions. It's another example of a power-made, out-of-control legislature.
  • Arkansas legislator tied to fatal bus crash in Louisiana

    Republican state Rep. David Wallace of Leachville, a current candidate for state Senate, has been identified as the owner of a company that rounded up a group of workers, apparently undocumented aliens, for flood relief work in Louisiana, including one with a poor driving record who was at the wheel in a fatal bus crash on Interstate 10.
  • 'Million-Dollar Thursday': A visit to Sherwood's hot check court

    We take a visit to the weekly hot check court in Sherwood District Court, the subject of a recent civil rights lawsuit filed by ACLU Arkansas and others, who say the system there results in a modern-day debtor's prison
  • Campus 'shame' list includes two Arkansas colleges

    Two Arkansas campuses have made an LGBT group's Shame List for seeking a waiver from compliance with the TItle IX civil rights law.
  • The Conway police report on Gilbert Baker's DWI arrest

    Gilbert Baker, the former state senator and state Republican Party chair, was "belligerent and emotional" after Conway police arrested him Friday night for DWI, refusing a breath alcohol test and erratic driving.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation