Monday, March 18, 2013

Evening roundup

Posted By on Mon, Mar 18, 2013 at 7:38 PM

Some odds and ends have trickled in, so I'll round them up:

* MARION BERRY: His family has sent a note to friends saying the former congressman went to UAMS with chest pains Saturday and had bypass surgery this afternoon. It went well, his family said. You can keep up on caringbridge.

* SHOULD YOU CARE: Republican gubernatorial candidate Curtis Coleman says Bill Halter's college-for-all plan is just Obama-style big government that will cost taxpayers. You may now apply this answer to anything concerning government. Maybe not farm subsidies if you're Rick Crawford.

* SPEAKING OF BILL HALTER: He got another union endorsement today, from the United Food and Commercial Workers. Shouldn't they wait to hear what Mike Ross has to say? He already said it. He pissed on Obamacare and universal health care, which the unions stood tall on. What's to wait for? More Republican-style anti-abortion, anti-gay, pro-gun, faux patriotic drivel? The UFCW cited Halter's work on the lottery to pay for college scholarships and said:

Halter is also a strong supporter of affordable and accessible health care, strengthening workers’ right to organize, financial reform, and protecting the environment through new clean energy technologies.

Ross? Nothing on these issues.

* DUSTIN MCDANIEL'S EXIT: Contributors to the attorney general's former Democratic gubernatorial campaign have begun receiving notices of refunds. Said a recipient of the note:

Primary contributions are being refunded at 43 cents on the dollar.

Runoff campaign contributions are supposed to be refunded in full.

His primary campaign raised $1,325,364.43. To date, they have spent $697,713.94. He is maintaining a carryover account for future needs. His campaign finance report may be viewed at http://www.sos.arkansas.gov after April 15.

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