Monday, July 15, 2013

Crowdfunding goal reached in Mayflower project

Posted By on Mon, Jul 15, 2013 at 11:42 AM

click to enlarge EIFLING: Starts this week. - VIA THE TERRY PROJECT, UBC ON FACEBOOK
  • Via The Terry Project, UBC on Facebook
  • EIFLING: Starts this week.

UPDATE: We asked, you answered. We've reached our goal. Many, many thanks to all those who contributed large and small! We can't wait to move forward. 

We've entered the home stretch of Muckraking the Mayflower Oil Spill, our crowdfunding project with InsideClimate News. We're raising money to bring two reporters to Mayflower for a deep investigation into the clean-up efforts and future of the Pegasus Pipeline. 

Today, we crossed the $20,000 threshold on crowdfunding. That leaves us with $5,600 and five days to reach our goal by June 19. Already, those who've contributed have ensured the project will go forward. Thanks!

Sam Eifling, the Arkansas native who's written for the likes of Slate and Deadspin (and writes movie reviews for the Times), starts on Wednesday. Elizabeth McGowan, the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for InsideClimate News, gets here in early August. 

They're eager to get to work and continue to build on the excellent reporting that InsideClimate News has done largely from afar. But to ensure Sam and Elizabeth are able to stay in Mayflower to thoroughly cover the spill, we need to reach our goal. If you believe this is an important story that deserves deeper coverage, we hope you'll consider giving (it's tax deductible!). 

Speaking of ICN's excellent coverage, today Lisa Song and Shruti Ravindran report on heavy metal contamination from the spill.

The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality and the pipeline operator, ExxonMobil, have found that most of the heavy metals in the cove and the main body of the lake are below levels of concern. Their testing is incomplete, however, because so far they’ve sampled only the water, not the soils or lake sediment.

Even when all the tests are done, health experts say it will be almost impossible to predict the long-term effects on residents, because little is known about how mixtures of heavy metals break down and change in the environment over time.

Joseph Graziano, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, said that in addition to determining the concentrations of heavy metals, scientists also must study if and how residents come into contact with the contaminants. "Sure, heavy metals have serious health effects," he said. "But only if exposure takes place."

Graziano and other experts say it's important to know, for example, if the metals are seeping into groundwater and reaching basements or backyard gardens, and if they're becoming more concentrated—and therefore more toxic—as they make their way up the food chain in Lake Conway.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

Readers also liked…

  • State Police issues statement on Jason Rapert 'threats'

    The State Police have issued a minor clarification in what appears to be an effort to soothe an enraged Sen. Jason Rapert, exposed here as overly excited about both a Conway parking lot question from a constituent as well as some inflammatory Internet rhetoric that he's interpreted as a dire threat on his life. State cops took his reports seriously, they say. But in the end, they found nothing actionable.
    • Sep 15, 2015
  • From Dallas, creative thinking about the Interstate 30 project

    An urban planner in Dallas says freeways are not always the answer. Incorporating some creativity already being used in Dallas and looking at the Interstate 30 project from a broader perspective, here are ideas that Arkansas highway planners have not considered. But should.
    • Nov 6, 2015
  • 'How to decimate a city' — a big freeway

    Reporting from around the U.S. continues to illustrate the folly of the Arkansas highway department and construction boosters like the chamber of commerce and Vice Mayor Lance Hines in advocating ever wider freeways through the heart of Little Rock. Syracuse, N.Y., is looking for a better way in a debate remarkably similar to the debate about widening Interstate 30 in Little Rock.
    • Nov 20, 2015

Most Shared

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
  • Art bull

    "God, I hate art," my late friend The Doctor used to say.
  • Not justice

    The strongest, most enduring calls for the death penalty come from those who feel deeply the moral righteousness of "eye-for-an-eye" justice, or retribution. From the depths of pain and the heights of moral offense comes the cry, "The suffering you cause is the suffering you shall receive!" From the true moral insight that punishment should fit the crime, cool logic concludes, "Killers should be killed." Yet I say: retribution yes; death penalty no.
  • Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

    Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.
  • The Ledell Lee execution thread

    Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.

Visit Arkansas

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Chuck Haralson and Ken Smith were inducted into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame during the 43rd annual Governor’s Conference on Tourism

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The sunny Sunday line

    • Trump is willing to shut down the government if he doesn't get funding for his…

    • on April 23, 2017
  • Re: The sunny Sunday line

    • STEPHEN SMITH THIS DATE IN ARKANSAS HISTORY 23-Apr 1912 Congressman Robert B. Macon of Helena…

    • on April 23, 2017
  • Re: The sunny Sunday line

    • My dear (and I mean that) Norma, do not over-imagine our attention span. There is…

    • on April 23, 2017

Blogroll

Slideshows

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation