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Thursday, September 19, 2013

Open line: Somebody tell Tom Cotton his pants are on fire

Posted by on Thu, Sep 19, 2013 at 5:00 PM


The line is open. Couldn't resist the Pryor campaign film clip above matching up a little Tom Cotton then and now. Evidence grows that the extremists would rather wreck the U.S. and crater financial markets than allow continuation of the law of the land — the Affordable Care Act and its enormous benefits, particularly for sick and poor Arkansans.

Republican extremists like Cotton also think they can sell the public that it will be the black Kenyan's fault if their economic terrorism works. In Arkansas, who knows? Obamaism runs deep. But lying about your position doesn't build your street cred.

On other topics:

* MISSING CAR FOUND: That missing Saline County sheriff's cruiser? It was found. Bookeeping error. Assigned to a detective.

* BREWING: ANOTHER FOI DISPUTE: Matt Campbell of the Blue Hog Report is tussling against with the secretary of state, this time over the failure of the office to fully comply with a request for information with a computer vendor related to voter ID cards necessary under the new voter ID law. Full transparency should be the goal on this hot topic. The secretary of state is redacting some information, claiming a generic "security" exception, which isn't mentioned in the FOI act. There is some protection offered for information that could compromise computer system security — passwords and code and the like. To be continued. 

* COTTON PROUD OF SCREWING THE POOR: Tom Cotton is boasting about House passage of legislation that will bar food stamps for "able-bodied" adults. If they can't get a job, the alternative: Starve, suckers! The bill would cut food stamp spending by an enormous $40 billion. That tab will roll downhill on children, elderly and others. It won't pass the Senate and Obama would veto it if it did. More meaningless posturing from the meanest son of Harvard privilege yet.

* BIG DAY FOR BALLOT TITLES: The attorney general today rejected the form of two ballot proposals: 1) the Regnat Populus measure to limit corporate campaign contributions for, among others, a failure to fully explain the measure and 2) an amendment to legalize same-sex marriage, because it didn't adequately explain the impact on existing law. But the office gave approval to the proposal by Arkansans for Equality for an amendment to simply repeal Amendment 83, the ban on same-sex marriage and civil unions. He has added language that makes clear that the amendment itself doesn't legalize same-sex marriage, which remains prohibited by statute and would empower the legislature to pass laws on the subject.

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    April 15, 2014
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  • Is Mark Pryor winning in the campaign for Senate against Tom Cotton?

    April 14, 2014
    With polls showing Pryor with a small lead, some are accusing the Cotton campaign of suggesting the Lincoln-Douglas debates because they're worried they're losing. /more/
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