Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Tom Cotton at last being paid what he's worth in U.S. Congress

Posted By on Tue, Oct 1, 2013 at 8:56 AM

click to enlarge FAT CHECKING ACCOUNT: Tom Cotton has one to see him through shutdown, even if he donates pay to charity.
  • FAT CHECKING ACCOUNT: Tom Cotton has one to see him through shutdown, even if he donates pay to charity.
Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton (Club for Growth, 4th District of Ark.) has piled disingenuous B.S. on top of more B.S.  this morning, a pile worthy of a Yell County feed lot.

In addition to lying about the supposed special benefits given congressional staff under Obamacare (none), he's announced through his non-responsive spokesperson that he'll give his $174,000 salary to charity during the time the government is shut down.

Will he take a tax deduction for that contribution, and thus allow all U.S. taxpayers to subsidize his publicity stunt?

The larger point is that the Harvard-educated former corporate consultant is better situated than the average government worker to endure a shutdown.

His financial statement, filed in June, shows he has a Bank of America checking account holding between $100,000 and $250,000. A checking account.

He also has a Liberty IRA worth $15,000 to $50,000.

And he has ownership in a retirement trust from McKinsey, the uberconsulting firm he left to implement the Club for Growth agenda in Washington. It is valued between $50,000 and $100,000.

Not bad for a 36-year-old man with no spouse to support and no children to feed. And he lists not a single penny in debt. He nominally occupies a rent house in Arkansas, remember. Plus, maybe the conservative Hudson Institute will kick in more $1,000 speaking fees to help tide him over if he feels a pinch. He can surely eat free at fund-raisers thrown for him in Texas or wherever by former Club for Growth executives and the like.

Quite a different situation than that facing the women covered by the WIC program. They have won a week to week extension for nutrition supplements. Quite different from the people on food stamps Cotton considers too richly fed for his taste.

The Mark Pryor campaign took note of Cotton's real priorities:

“There’s no denying that from his very first month in Washington, Congressman Cotton has been a cheerleader for shutting down the government, and now Arkansas families are living with his irresponsible priorities,” said Jeff Weaver, Pryor for Senate campaign manager. “Just like most Arkansans, Mark Pryor is tired of the political drama, and he’ll continue working with reasonable members of both parties to find commonsense solutions that cut spending responsibly while protecting Social Security and Medicare, keep student loans affordable and give certainty to our farmers and rural families.”

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