Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Tom Cotton at last being paid what he's worth in U.S. Congress

Posted By on Tue, Oct 1, 2013 at 8:56 AM

click to enlarge FAT CHECKING ACCOUNT: Tom Cotton has one to see him through shutdown, even if he donates pay to charity.
  • FAT CHECKING ACCOUNT: Tom Cotton has one to see him through shutdown, even if he donates pay to charity.
Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton (Club for Growth, 4th District of Ark.) has piled disingenuous B.S. on top of more B.S.  this morning, a pile worthy of a Yell County feed lot.

In addition to lying about the supposed special benefits given congressional staff under Obamacare (none), he's announced through his non-responsive spokesperson that he'll give his $174,000 salary to charity during the time the government is shut down.

Will he take a tax deduction for that contribution, and thus allow all U.S. taxpayers to subsidize his publicity stunt?

The larger point is that the Harvard-educated former corporate consultant is better situated than the average government worker to endure a shutdown.

His financial statement, filed in June, shows he has a Bank of America checking account holding between $100,000 and $250,000. A checking account.

He also has a Liberty IRA worth $15,000 to $50,000.

And he has ownership in a retirement trust from McKinsey, the uberconsulting firm he left to implement the Club for Growth agenda in Washington. It is valued between $50,000 and $100,000.

Not bad for a 36-year-old man with no spouse to support and no children to feed. And he lists not a single penny in debt. He nominally occupies a rent house in Arkansas, remember. Plus, maybe the conservative Hudson Institute will kick in more $1,000 speaking fees to help tide him over if he feels a pinch. He can surely eat free at fund-raisers thrown for him in Texas or wherever by former Club for Growth executives and the like.

Quite a different situation than that facing the women covered by the WIC program. They have won a week to week extension for nutrition supplements. Quite different from the people on food stamps Cotton considers too richly fed for his taste.

The Mark Pryor campaign took note of Cotton's real priorities:

“There’s no denying that from his very first month in Washington, Congressman Cotton has been a cheerleader for shutting down the government, and now Arkansas families are living with his irresponsible priorities,” said Jeff Weaver, Pryor for Senate campaign manager. “Just like most Arkansans, Mark Pryor is tired of the political drama, and he’ll continue working with reasonable members of both parties to find commonsense solutions that cut spending responsibly while protecting Social Security and Medicare, keep student loans affordable and give certainty to our farmers and rural families.”

Tags: , ,

Favorite

Speaking of Tom Cotton, Arkansas Politics

Comments (15)

Showing 1-15 of 15

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-15 of 15

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Arkansas conservatives react to same-sex marriage decision

    Jason Rapert, Mike Huckabee, the Meeks bros, Jerry Cox — beyond these extremists, it's hard to find statements from other Arkansas conservatives. That tell you something?
    • Jun 26, 2015
  • IHOP coming down, but .....

    I always scan the Little Rock City Board for items of interest this week and this one caught my eye: A zoning measure required by a proposal to tear down the IHOP at Markham and University.
    • Apr 30, 2016
  • Monticello preparing for KKK rally

    Drew County authorities are taking precautions, but also watching their words, about apparent plans for a Ku Klux Klan meeting Saturday.
    • Jul 22, 2015

Most Shared

  • UPDATE: Retired Arkansas Arts Center director Townsend Wolfe dies at 81

    Townsend Durant Wolfe, III, retired director and chief curator of the Arkansas Arts Center, has died at 81.
  • Subpoenas identify names of federal interest in kickback probe

    The Northwest Arkansas Economic Development District today provided me with the subpoena it received from federal investigators in a probe that led to former Republican Rep. Micah Neal's guilty plea to taking kickbacks from money he guided to a nonprofit agency and a private college in Springdale, apparently Ecclesia College.
  • Human Services says it's eliminated Medicaid application backlog

    The state Human Services Department has informed Gov. Asa Hutchinson that it has all but eliminated a backlog in applications for Medicaid coverage.
  • Praising Asa

    Let us now praise the governor for a starkly moderate record, at least in comparison with other red-state executives.
  • Glass houses

    Having gotten a deep security briefing and probably a confidential glimpse of our own vast cyberspying operation, Donald Trump is no longer pretty sure that the Kremlin didn't hack Democratic computers or employ other tactics to help his election.

Visit Arkansas

Indian Rock House at Fairfield Bay

Indian Rock House at Fairfield Bay

Winter is the perfect time to explore the natural stone shelters where native Arkansans once lived

Most Viewed

  • Save my health care. Just don't call it Obamacare

    A reporter for the Toronto Star visited Arkansas to illustrate the irony, to use a kind word, that abounds in the rush by Republicans to repeal Obamacare.
  • King Day open line, plus a news roundup

    Here's the King Day open line, plus some news and comment.
  • Google says: It's Lee's Birthday in Arkansas

    Several people have been shocked in checking to see whether a business or government office was open today and found, along with normal hours, a statement that hours might vary because it is Robert E. Lee's birthday in Arkansas and hours might differ. No mention of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Free beer tomorrow: Trump's health plan

    Donald Trump has proclaimed that he has a health care plan coming that will cover everyone — yes, UNIVERSAL COVERAGE — and have lower deductible payments. More coverage for less, he suggests, with plenty of pain for Big Pharma in tough negotiating.
  • Pork barrel included more than $40,000 for ozone therapy shipped from NWA to Benton

    Blogger Russ Racop uncovers another curious bit of spending of the pork barrel money known as the General Improvement Fund: Shipment of more than $40,000 from Northwest Arkansas legislators' allotment to a little-known outfit in Saline County that promotes an alternative medicine known as ozone therapy. Familiar legislative names were involved.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation