Friday, October 11, 2013

Obamacare is good for small business

Posted By on Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 10:14 AM

click to enlarge MOST EXEMPT: Most U.S. businesses are too small to be covered by the Obamacare insurance mandate.
  • MOST EXEMPT: Most U.S. businesses are too small to be covered by the Obamacare insurance mandate.
You read that headline right, though it's a polar opposite assertion from that intoned relentlessly by teabaggers, Kochs and Republican spear carriers, anybody named Hutchinson and the Club for Greed's marching and chowder society, the National Federation of Independent Business.

Here are the lucid facts, as expressed in a short and simple piece in the New Yorker by James Surowiecki.

Read it. Give it to Nate Bell, the Meeks boys and folks like that. I know. Pointless. But you'll feel better knowing you've handed somebody facts versus blind faith.

The article notes:

Most businesses, because they are small, are exempt from employer insurance mandates in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Most of the big businesses that are required to offer insurance or pay a penalty already do so. A relatively small number of businesses fall in a gap that will feel a pinch. Sorry for them, but it's not enough to harm the overall economy.

Benefits of Obamacare are enormous. It's easier to start a small business when you don't have to worry about health care. And the ready availability of health care in the new exchanges prevents people from being locked into bad jobs simply to hang onto coverage. The system currently works as a disincentive to entrepreneurs. Freed from "job lock," more people will go out on their own and start new businesses. THAT is good for the economy.

The unpredictability of rates (one really sick employee can screw a small business with a group policy) discourages small businesses from offering insurance.

Obamacare changes all this. It provides tax credits to smaller businesses that want to insure their employees. And it requires “community rating” for small businesses, just as it does for individuals, sharply restricting insurers’ ability to charge a company more because it has employees with higher health costs. And small-business exchanges will in effect allow companies to pool their risks to get better rates. “You’re really taking the benefits that big companies enjoy, and letting small businesses tap into that,” Arensmeyer said. This may lower costs, and it will insure that small businesses can hire the best person for a job rather than worry about health issues.

The U.S., against the world, has a relatively small number of small businesses and self-employed people. Removing health care from the equation would undoubtedly spur more of them. Small businesses should cheer Obamacare, not curse it. Remember that the curses are being encouraged by the wealthy, who — yes — are being asked to pay a bit more in taxes for the common good of a healthier.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Matt Campbell files ethics complaint against Dennis Milligan

    Little Rock attorney and blogger Matt Campbell, whose knack for deep research brought down Mark Darr, Mike Maggio and Dexter Suggs, now has his sights trained on another worthy target. Today, he filed a 113-page ethics complaint against state Treasurer Dennis Milligan that includes 14 separate allegations.
    • Aug 20, 2015
  • Lawyers plead for mercy in Fort Smith forum shopping case

    Twelve of the lawyers facing punishment by federal Judge P.K. Holmes in Fort Smith for moving a class action case against an insurance company out of his court to a state court where it was speedily settled have filed their argument against sanctions.
    • Jun 16, 2016
  • State Police issues statement on Jason Rapert 'threats'

    The State Police have issued a minor clarification in what appears to be an effort to soothe an enraged Sen. Jason Rapert, exposed here as overly excited about both a Conway parking lot question from a constituent as well as some inflammatory Internet rhetoric that he's interpreted as a dire threat on his life. State cops took his reports seriously, they say. But in the end, they found nothing actionable.
    • Sep 15, 2015

Most Shared

  • Judge Griffen dismisses execution challenge; says hands tied by 'shameful' Ark. Supreme Court ruling

    Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen ruled today that he had no choice based on  a past Arkansas Supreme Court decision  but to dismiss a lawsuit by Death Row inmates seeking to challenge the constitutionality of the state's lethal injection process.But the judge did so unhappily with sharp criticism of the Arkansas Supreme Court for failing to address critical points raised in the lawsuit.
  • Metroplan sets public hearing on 30 Crossing

    The controversial 30 Crossing project to fatten up seven miles of Interstate 30 from U.S. Highway 67 in North Little Rock to Interstate 530 in Little Rock will once again get a public hearing, thanks to a vote of the Metroplan board Wednesday.
  • New suit argues Bruce Ward mentally unfit for execution

    A new lawsuit argues that Bruce Ward, scheduled to die by lethal injection next month, is not mentally competent to be executed. It says his condition has been worsened by decades of solitary confinement.

Visit Arkansas

Brant Collins named Group Travel Manager for Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Brant Collins named Group Travel Manager for Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Collins to work toward increasing visitation to Arkansas by groups and promoting the state's appeal

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation