Friday, November 1, 2013

UPDATE: A deeper look at those canceled insurance policies

Posted By on Fri, Nov 1, 2013 at 7:16 AM

The sound bites are so easy. The explanations are so long.

Nonetheless, if facts matter, give a read to Talking Points Memo's elaboration on the horror stories about Obamacare-forced insurance policy cancellations:

President Obama wasn't entirely right in 2009 when he said that if you like your health care plan, then you can keep it. Some people are going to have their health insurance plans canceled, and it does have something to do with Obamacare.

From a political standpoint, that's enough to ignite a firestorm. From a policy standpoint, there's a whole lot more going on here.

What really matters is what happens to the people who are receiving those cancellation letters that congressional Republicans have been parading in front of the cameras?

The bottom line: Almost all of them are going to receive the same or much better coverage, and many of them are going to receive financial help to purchase it.

Bottom line, About 3 percent of Americans will have to buy different plans. It's indisputable that the plans will be better than the coverage they now have. Some of those, thanks to subsidies, may not suffer financial consequences. But 3 percent of Americans is a large number. Still, said Jonathan Gruber, who oversaw Romneycare in Massschusetts, about the 3 percent:

"We have to as a society be able to accept that," he told the New Yorker. "Don't get me wrong, that's a shame, but no law in the history of America makes everyone better off."

UPDATE: Still more good reporting on the Republicans' favorite horror story here. It doesn't much resemble the repetitious messaging being machine gunned by, for example, Extremist Tom Cotton.

Tags: , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas Supreme Court denies rehearing in death penalty challenge, but delays mandate

    The Arkansas Supreme Court today refused to rehear the case denying Death Row inmates information about drugs used by the state in the lethal injection process.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Welspun layoffs: Another example of corporate welfare folly

    Layoffs at the Welspun pipe plant in Little Rock are a reminder of the folly of corporate welfare and the inability of Arkansas to separate itself from global economic forces. See the Fayetteville shale. And keep a watchful eye on that Sun Paper pulp mill proposed near Arkadelphia.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Hamburg bank manager gets 21 months for theft

    Melinda Gwin, 49, of Hamburg has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and ordered to repay $210,875 stolen from the First National Bank of Crossett. She was sentenced in El Dorado federal court, according to a Justice Department news release.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Rep. Nate Bell blasts adoption story before seeing it; 'rehoming' bill introduced

    Response to our story about rehoming and adoption has been overwhelmingly positive, with one exception. Rep. Nate Bell (R-Mena) has informed me that writing this story makes me the predator and Justin Harris the victim. I'm hellbound, apparently.
    • Mar 4, 2015
  • Is Arkansas planning to withdraw from PARCC, the Common Core testing consortium?

    Rep. Mark Lowery, a Republican from Maumelle, has introduced a bill that would put the brakes on Arkansas's implementation of standardized testing based on Common Core State Standards. Lowery says the bill is motivated in part because legislators have been told by ADE officials, unofficially, that "the PARCC contract will not be renewed" beyond the current academic year.
    • Feb 3, 2015
  • Tom Cotton's 'bizarre speech' on Guantanamo

    Lots of attention on the web today about remarks by n by U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton. Vox called his remarks on preserving a detention center in Guantanamo Bay " bizarre."
    • Feb 5, 2015

Most Shared

  • Tackling autism, child by child

    An Arkansas Children's Hospital doctor is testing a new drug that targets one of a host of ailments the highly individual disorder can cause.
  • 1957 all over again

    Last week, the State Board of Education voted to ignore federal courts and allow school district transfers that will encourage segregation.
  • Death penalty lives

    Barely clinging to its flagging life, the death penalty got a merciful reprieve last month from the unlikeliest quarter, the Arkansas Supreme Court.
  • Drinking culture

    Here we go again. At the rate these campus sexual abuse sagas are making news, it's reasonable to ask what college administrators can possibly be thinking about.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation