Monday, November 11, 2013

Veterans Day: Obituary for a 'common man'

Posted By on Mon, Nov 11, 2013 at 7:16 AM

click to enlarge MEDAL OF HONOR: Awarded to John Hawk.
  • MEDAL OF HONOR: Awarded to John Hawk.
Media are full of Veterans Day statements and tributes today. A coincidental article struck me.

It was the obituary for John Hawk of Bremerton, Wash., who was awarded the Medal of Honor for uncommon valor during the Allied slog through Normandy. While wounded, he served as a human guidepost for artillery fire to take out German tanks. He was credited with a critical role in preventing a German breakout from the Falaise pocket and the capture of 500 German troops. He was wounded three more times before the war ended. Said the New York Times obituary:

Mr. Hawk had been in so many firefights that when he was told he would receive the Medal of Honor, the military’s highest award for valor, he had no idea why.

“I am a common man who did the best I could in the time and place I found myself,” he told The Chicago Tribune at a gathering of Medal of Honor recipients in Chicago in 1990.

“I was home on R and R and had been wounded four different times when I got a phone call saying they were considering me for the Medal of Honor. I said, ‘Medal of Honor? For when? For what day? What place? What time? Are you sure you mean me?’ You see, none of us consider ourselves heroes.”

Hawk became an elementary school principal. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that generations of students and parents knew little of his wartime exploits. I was a member of the post-war baby boom and grew up in a neighborhood with kids in every house and war veterans at the head of seemingly every one of them. Both my parents served with the Army overseas in World War II. There were heroes and commandoes and stateside desk jockeys of every description in Our Town. But typical, I think, was the father of one of my best friends. Until he died and a full obituary appeared in the local paper, I didn't know he was a paratrooper and battalion commander with a Purple Heart and Silver Stars whose battle record included North Africa, Sicily, Normandy, Holland and the final push into Germany. To me, he was a lawyer and a dad.

The universality of service, in a way, made it common and almost unremarkable among the men and women resuming civilian lives. This didn't diminish the appreciation of their military service or reduce the awe at the exploits of the uncommon among them. I still recall the reverent annual service at my high school, an age not much given to reverence, before the memorial with the chiseled names of alumni who had fallen in World War II. But I sometimes wonder if we've ratcheted up our Veterans Day statements and observances in part because of guilt that so many fewer — volunteers all — are doing the work for so many. I wonder how the volunteer service affects our feelings about decisions to commit them to battle. And I wonder, too, how carefully we consider if we've honored them enough — through medical care, readjustment to stateside life and other help — on the other 364 days in the year.

Tags: , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (18)

Showing 1-18 of 18

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-18 of 18

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Farewell to a school teacher, Susan Turner Purvis

    A tribute to a great school teacher, Susan Turner Purvis, who died yesterday. Far too soon.
    • Jul 17, 2015
  • The inspiring Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton's campaign for president illustrates again the double standard applied to women. Some writers get it. They even find the supposedly unlikable Clinton inspiring.
    • Oct 16, 2016
  • Monticello preparing for KKK rally

    Drew County authorities are taking precautions, but also watching their words, about apparent plans for a Ku Klux Klan meeting Saturday.
    • Jul 22, 2015

Most Shared

  • Home again

    The plan, formulated months ago, was this: Ellen and I were going to go to Washington for inauguration festivities, then fly out the morning after the balls for Panama City and a long planned cruise to begin with a Panama Canal passage.
  • Who needs courts?

    Not since the John Birch Society's "Impeach Earl Warren" billboards littered Southern roadsides after the Supreme Court's school-integration decision in 1954 has the American judicial system been under such siege, but who would have thought the trifling Arkansas legislature would lead the charge?
  • Bungling

    If the late, great Donald Westlake had written spy thrillers instead of crime capers, they'd read a lot like the opening weeks of the Trump administration.
  • UPDATE: Campus carry bill amended by Senate to require training

    The Senate this morning added an amendment to Rep. Charlie Collins campus carry bill that incorporates the effort denied in committee yesterday to require a 16-hour additional training period before university staff members with concealed carry permits may take the weapons on campus.
  • Director to resign from state court administrative office

    Supreme Court Chief Justice John Dan Kemp announced today the resignation of J.D. Gingerich, long-time director of the administrative office of the courts.

Visit Arkansas

New Crystal Bridges exhibit explores Mexican-American border

New Crystal Bridges exhibit explores Mexican-American border

Border Cantos is a timely, new and free exhibit now on view at Crystal Bridges.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation