Thursday, February 20, 2014

Johnny Moore resigns as president of Philander Smith College

Posted By on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 2:49 PM

click to enlarge RESIGNS: Philander president Johnny Moore.
  • RESIGNS: Philander president Johnny Moore.
Philander Smith College, the historically black institution in Little Rock, has announced by news release today the abrupt resignation of President Johnny Moore to pursue "other personal and profesional opporutnities." He'd been president only since July 2012. The college has supplied me with the news release.

Lloyd Hervey will be interim president.

There've been rumors in recent days of controversy at the college. I'm seeking College Board Chair Artee Williams for further information. The Board met today and established a search committee for a replacement.

UPDATE: Williams returned my call. In response to my questions about reports received here of potential issues of controversy, he said: "All is well." He said the campus is moving forward with all its initiatives, including completion of a new campus center, and that enrollment was growing. 

He referred questions to Moore, who's no longer on campus, on reasons for his giving notice. I asked about possible budget issues. Williams said: "There is not a budget issue. Every small private college has budget challenges. So do public institutions. That's standard." Generally, he said of Philander currently, "We're good."

The news release follows:


Dr. Johnny Moore has resigned as president of Philander Smith College in Little Rock to pursue other personal and professional opportunities. He had been working as president of Philander since July of 2012 and was formally invested May 3, 2013.

"While he is no longer president of Philander, Dr. Johnny Moore remains a valued alumnus and much-honored former athlete, with strong ties to our college," said Board Chairman Artee Williams.

The Board of Trustees will soon initiate a nationwide search for a 14th president for Philander Smith College. Interim President Lloyd E. Hervey, Ed.D., will work with faculty, students, alumni and donors to continue Philander's mission to graduate academically accomplished students who are grounded as advocates for social justice, determined to intentionally change the world for the better.

Founded in 1877, Philander Smith College in downtown Little Rock is a private, residential, co-educational, four-year, historically African American undergraduate liberal arts college known nationally for its social justice initiative and affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Philander Smith College has more than 500 students working toward four degrees: bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, bachelor of business administration, and bachelor of social work.

Tags: , , ,


Speaking of...

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Question raised on Dallas Cowboy gift to NLR cops

    Blogger Russ Racop raises an interesting question, as he sometimes does, about Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones' gift of free tickets for North Little Rock cops to attend a Dallas Cowboy football game.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • Backers of struck marijuana act urge vote for surviving amendment

    Backers of Issue 7, the medial marijuana initiated act that the Arkansas Supreme Court today ruled hadn't qualified for the ballot, have issued a statement urging backers to vote for the surviving medical marijuana amendment, Issue 6.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • Group calls for independent review of police shooting

    Arkansas Stop the Violence, a grassroots group focused on stemming violence, particularly in black neighborhoods, issued a statement today calling for an "independent" investigation of the police fatal shooting Tuesday night of Roy Lee Richards.
    • Oct 27, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • War. What is it good for? Tom Cotton has an idea

    Twenty-four hours after meddling in President Obama's talks with Iran, hawkish Sen. Tom Cotton scheduled an off-the-record meeting with defense contractors, who'd be happy to supply goods for U.S. armed incursions in the Middle East.
    • Mar 9, 2015
  • Talking Tall: Bobby Jindal and Rick Perry jump on Tom Cotton's bandwagon

    Judging from Twitter, the latest fad in extremist circles is to join Sen. Tom Cotton's foray into usurping presidential authority for international diplomacy by waving a finger at Iran in hopes of provoking a conflict on which his backers in the defense industry can make some money. So when do the usual Arkansas suspect fall in line?
    • Mar 11, 2015
  • Morning minutia: Legislation to protect bank from lawful taxes

    Todd Turner, an Arkadelphia lawyer, steps in today for one of those lessons in what's behind one of the dozens of arcane pieces of legislation that sail into law every legislative session with the public none the wiser. Here it's a bailout for big banks at the expense of county government.
    • Mar 12, 2015

Most Shared

  • Issue 3: blank check

    Who could object to a constitutional amendment "concerning job creation, job expansion and economic development," which is the condensed title for Issue 3 for Arkansas voters on Nov. 8?
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said
  • Ted Suhl loses another bid for new trial; faces stiff sentencing recommendation

    Ted Suhl, the former operator of residential and out-patient mental health services, has lost a second bid to get a new trial on his conviction for paying bribes to influence state Human Services Department policies. Set for sentencing Thursday, Suhl faces a government request for a sentence up to almost 20 years. He argues for no more than 33 months.
  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments



© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation