Monday, March 17, 2014

Tom Cotton still mum on marriage details

Posted By on Mon, Mar 17, 2014 at 12:05 PM

click to enlarge NEWLYWEDS: Tom and Anna Cotton. - KARK
  • KARK
  • NEWLYWEDS: Tom and Anna Cotton.
Despite repeated requests, no further details have emerged about Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton's marriage over the weekend. His office hasn't responded to requests for basic info — time, place, bride's full name and biographical information. One other question arises: Did he retain a once-expressed appreciation for "covenant marriage"?

Cotton distributed Sunday a photo of himself and his new wife, Anna, via Instagram, but said little. He was photographed in the company of Anna Peckham at an American Enterprise Institute event last year and a woman by that name is a lawyer with Republican political credentials that would seem a good philosophical match for the congressman. Perhaps High Profile will have more this coming Sunday.

In the meanwhile, one other question is raised by Cotton's opinion column writing on love and marriage while a student at Harvard. He wrote then about his  informal survey of women students, whom he said had a great fear of being left by husbands. He had some ideas, including improving men. He praised the Promise Keepers movement in that respect. He wrote about the ills of  feminism and no-fault divorce. Men might choose divorce "thoughtlessly," he wrote, and it often leaves women worse off financially. Said Cotton:

...we have state politicians, most of whom are men, taking on no fault divorce. Louisiana recently became the first state to attack this 1970's innovation. Louisiana's new law creates something called "covenant marriage." Couples who choose a covenant marriage undergo counseling before they marry and can divorce only with fault, defined as abandonment, physical abuse, adultery or conviction of a capital crime. State legislator Tony Perkins, the author of the law (and an active member in PK), expects covenant marriages will soon account for half of all new marriages in Louisiana. Many states are expected to follow Louisiana's lead.

Presumably, women should encourage such developments since divorce leads to their "greatest fear in life." And most women probably do support them, but not the putative potentates of feminism.

He concluded:

Ordinary women must not only defend these men against feminism, but also demand that all other men accept the lifelong nature of marriage. If not, one-half of all women who marry see their "greatest fear" come true. If so, they can have their "deepest hopes" fulfilled.

So. Did Cotton enter a covenant marriage? If he married in Arkansas, it has been available here since 2001, when Gov. Mike Huckabee led its adoption. It has never really caught on to the extent its Louisiana sponsor predicted, though. (Speaking as someone nearing year 38, I can testify it is possible to remain happily married without benefit of the "covenant" process.)

UPDATE: KFSM confirms the bride is Anna Peckham, who grew up in rural Nebraska and is described as a Virginia lawyer. She will become Anna Cotton. No locale of the Saturday wedding revealed. Or if it was a covenant marriage. Said KFMS:

The couple will take a short honeymoon during the congressional recess and ultimately live and raise a family in Arkansas.

Tags: , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (11)

Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Mike Huckabee, meet James Madison

    Not that it will do much good, but Times columnist Ernest Dumas this week provides some useful Founding Father history, plus a little bit of Bible, for how wrong-headed Mike Huckabee, Asa Hutchinson, the Republican legislature and others are in using government to enforce their religious views.
    • May 26, 2015
  • The long and winding road: No exception yet for 30 Crossing

    The Arkansas highway department's representative on the Metroplan board of directors told the board today that the department is requesting an exception to the planning agency's cap on six lanes for its 30 Crossing project to widen Interstate 30 from six to 10 (and more) lanes.
    • Jun 29, 2016
  • Cosmopolitan: Why were the Duggars made famous in the first place?

    A writer in Cosmopolitan wonders why it took so long for attention to the "disturbingly misogynistic" dimension of the Jim Bob Duggar family.
    • May 28, 2015

People who saved…

Most Shared

  • Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist resigns

    Bob Scoggin, 50, the Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist whose job it was to review the work of agencies, including DAH and the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, for possible impacts on historic properties, resigned from the agency on Monday. Multiple sources say Scoggin, whom they describe as an "exemplary" employee who the week before had completed an archeological project on DAH property, was told he would be fired if he did not resign.
  • Arkansas Democrats' rocky road forward

    No state political party in the modern era has had a more abrupt fall than Arkansas's Democrats
  • Child welfare too often about 'punishing parents,' DCFS consultant tells legislators

    Reforms promised by the Division of Children and Family Services are "absolutely necessary," the president of DCFS's independent consultant told a legislative committee this morning. But they still may not be enough to control the state's alarming growth in foster care cases.
  • Donald Trump taps Tom Price for HHS Secretary; Medicaid and Medicare cuts could be next

    The selection of Tom Price as HHS secretary could signal that the Trump administration will dismantle the current healthcare safety net, both Medicaid and Medicare.
  • Fake economics

    Fake news is a new phenomenon in the world of politics and policy, but hokey economic scholarship has been around as long as Form 1040 and is about as reliable as the news hoaxes that enlivened the presidential campaign.

Visit Arkansas

Arkansas remembers Pearl Harbor

Arkansas remembers Pearl Harbor

Central Arkansas venues have a full week of commemorative events planned

Most Viewed

  • Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist resigns

    Bob Scoggin, 50, the Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist whose job it was to review the work of agencies, including DAH and the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, for possible impacts on historic properties, resigned from the agency on Monday. Multiple sources say Scoggin, whom they describe as an "exemplary" employee who the week before had completed an archeological project on DAH property, was told he would be fired if he did not resign.
  • The gloomy Sunday line

    For now, over to you.
  • New York Times columnist calls Pine Bluff nonprofit leader "America's Mother Teresa"

    Annette Dove, the founder and CEO of the Pine Bluff nonprofit Targeting Our People's Priorities with Service (TOPPS), is the subject of a glowing column profile by the New York Times Nicholas Kristof. In the wake of a a dispiriting election, Dove is "a salve for our aches and wounds, for she represents the American grass roots’ best," Kristoff writes.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation