Friday, May 30, 2014

Notes from the road: Herman's Ribhouse review and the curious Internet filtering at Ark. Supreme Court

Posted By on Fri, May 30, 2014 at 9:30 AM

click to enlarge 39 YEARS LATER: Still satisfying.
  • 39 YEARS LATER: Still satisfying.

I'm in Fayetteville this morning and if my wife's judicial duties finish in time we hope to get up to Crystal Bridges for the Paley collection exhibit. As I cool my heels in a Washington County Courthouse jury room, I thought I'd clear the decks of a couple of things:

* DINING REVIEW; HERMAN'S RIBHOUSE: It is unbelievable, but the last time I set foot in this classic roadhouse was 1975. Law professor Bill Clinton was holding forth on colorful sayings he'd picked up on the road during his losing race for Congress. "I wouldn't piss in his ear if his brain was on fire," lingers pungently in my memory. Herman has gone, to the great Smokehouse in the Sky but, I gotta tell you, Herman's is worth a stop. We tried to go on a Razorback weekend last year but the line, served by a portable tent, was two hours long, if you could make it at all.

There was a good crowd early on a Thursday night. Bottom line: Huge portions of food, well-cooked with perfect team service. And fairly priced. Who knew that a $9.50 appetizer of shrimp remoulade would be maybe a dozen jumbo (and I know jumbo) boiled shrimp, perfectly cooked and plenty cold. The small rib plate meant three huge spare ribs, tender and peppery. They aren't my favorite ribs in Arkansas, but they are rich and good. The cole slaw is first-rate. Beer is served in frozen solid mugs. If I had a quibble it would be to add some normal beer on draft to go with the crafty assortment available, including a couple of locally brewed drafts. I think I had Schlitz my last visit. Setting remains perfect., with red-checked curtains, wood paneling and a hard-working grill team right behind the bar. They call this "open kitchen" in trendy restaurants.

* NO JUSTICE ON THE INTERNET: A lawyer attending a continuing legal education session yesterday in the Arkansas Supreme Court building discovered that the free WiFi there didn't allow access to all his favorite websites. He could get Asa Hutchinson's website. And the website of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. But, among others, websites of the Arkansas Blog and the Pinnacle Law Firm were labeled "suspicious" and not accessible. I confirmed this and filed an objection on our status with Blue Coat, the web filtering service in use there.. In time, we were granted readmission to the worldwide web as viewed from chambers of the Arkansas Supreme Court and Court of Appeals. Why did this happen? I do not believe it was an automated selection based on content, even if this blog does use words like piss now and then. I believe it was a result of a specific complaint to get us shut out. I won't share my suspicion on a computer-savvy person of my acquaintance that I'd finger if this were to be so.

Oh, didn't you know? The Pinnacle Law Firm is the home of Matt Campbell, otherwise known as author of the Blue Hog Report. 
Coincidence, right?

PS — To make clear if I didn't already, I don't think these blocks were institutional in nature. But the nature of the Blue Coat filtering service is that anybody can file a complaint against a website. How they act on those remains shrouded in mystery for the moment, but I do know that a couple of sites happened to have been among the victims for no good reason that is apparent to me.


Tags: , , , , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (11)

Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas Supreme Court denies rehearing in death penalty challenge, but delays mandate

    The Arkansas Supreme Court today refused to rehear the case denying Death Row inmates information about drugs used by the state in the lethal injection process.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Welspun layoffs: Another example of corporate welfare folly

    Layoffs at the Welspun pipe plant in Little Rock are a reminder of the folly of corporate welfare and the inability of Arkansas to separate itself from global economic forces. See the Fayetteville shale. And keep a watchful eye on that Sun Paper pulp mill proposed near Arkadelphia.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Hamburg bank manager gets 21 months for theft

    Melinda Gwin, 49, of Hamburg has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and ordered to repay $210,875 stolen from the First National Bank of Crossett. She was sentenced in El Dorado federal court, according to a Justice Department news release.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • The shame of Robert E. Lee/MLK Day in Arkansas

    This morning, I was a student ambassador for Philander Smith College and the Social Justice Institute at a House Committee that discussed Rep. Nate Bell’s proposal to divide a Robert E. Lee and Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.
    • Feb 11, 2015
  • Wynton Marsalis plays concert for Clark Terry at Pine Bluff hospital

    Wynton Marsalis visited Pine Bluff yesterday to pay a visit to the 93-year-old jazz legend Clark Terry, currently in the hospital (and accepting donations for his medical care). Terry, born in St. Louis and mentored by Louis Armstrong, played in bands with icons like Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Quincy Jones, and was a stated influence on trumpeters like Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie (who considered Terry the greatest jazz trumpeter in the world).
    • Dec 10, 2014
  • The charge of the Lee brigade on change in Lee/King holiday law; bill defeated

    Rep. Nate Bell's bill to end inclusion of Robert E. Lee in the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday is before committee this morning.
    • Jan 28, 2015

Most Shared

  • Tackling autism, child by child

    An Arkansas Children's Hospital doctor is testing a new drug that targets one of a host of ailments the highly individual disorder can cause.
  • 1957 all over again

    Last week, the State Board of Education voted to ignore federal courts and allow school district transfers that will encourage segregation.
  • Death penalty lives

    Barely clinging to its flagging life, the death penalty got a merciful reprieve last month from the unlikeliest quarter, the Arkansas Supreme Court.
  • Drinking culture

    Here we go again. At the rate these campus sexual abuse sagas are making news, it's reasonable to ask what college administrators can possibly be thinking about.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation