Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Walmart critics gear up for company stockholders meeting

Posted By on Tue, Jun 3, 2014 at 7:09 AM

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Walmart 1 percent, 
which highlights the enormous and growing gap between the wealth of heirs to the Walmart fortune and the people who work for them, is gearing up for the coming annual meeting of the retail chain in Arkansas. It's participating in "strikes" around the country and promises to be visible this week in Arkansas. Above is a photo distributed yesterday by Twitter of a group demonstrating outside Walmart Chair Rob Walton's home in Arizona.

The Twitter feed gives you a good flavor of the effort, supported by unions. Example:

Last yr #Walmart Chair Rob Walton made $821K/hr. The #WalmartEconomy works for him, not us.

The wealthiest 1 percent in the U.S. are paupers compared with the Walton heirs, the organization likes to note.

the top 1% inherit $2.7 Million on average. 4 Waltons get that much in Walmart dividends every 8 hours

There's also a tumblr page that pokes fun at "rich people problems," such as when Rob Walton tried to dodge a vehicle import duty on a $12 million vintage Ferrari, a tax that would have cost him 12 minutes of Walmart earnings. And  a blog that calls attention to such things as Walton support of retrograde, homophobic politicians (Br'er  Rapert.)

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