Friday, June 13, 2014

Tom Cotton a 'no' and proud of it

Posted By on Fri, Jun 13, 2014 at 7:28 AM

Participants in the Delta Grassroots Caucus asked a lot of questions of Republican Senate candidate Tom Cotton via Skype yesterday and he owned up proudly to his record of opposition to popular program after popular program.

Talk Business has a full rundown

Yes, he opposed the farm bill. Too much money for food stamps.

Yes, he thinks food stamps are a bad investment. If people starve, I guess maybe they'll get off their butts and work.

He opposes spending money on highway beautification. Aesthetics? Blah.

He likes highway spending but he doesn't want to spend money on mass transit in big cities.  Sure. It makes far more sense to spend millions on rural freeways in Arkansas that serve a small number of people at high cost rather than efficient mass transit that takes pollution machines off the road.

He's a proud opponent of the paycheck fairness act. Why should women be paid the same as men for the same job? The men who make these pay decisions have good reason for them and that's good enough for Tom Cotton. Oh sure. He supports the concept of equal pay for equal work. Just not an avenue in the courts to get it.

Cotton is also proud to support an end to the Delta Regional Commission. He says, of course, he likes all the projects it has funded, we just don't need the commission. Right. And then he'd vote against the appropriation bills for the same projects by calling them pork-laden Christmas trees, like disaster aid bills he's opposed.

Cotton may be right. The long efforts of the Kochs and others to instill in voters the belief that strangling government will be good for them might result in election of a strangler. If so, there'll be a rude awakening for a lot of voters.

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