Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Lawsuit challenges licensing standards for hair braiders

Posted By on Tue, Jun 17, 2014 at 1:56 PM

click to enlarge PLAINTIFFS: Christine McLean (left) demonstrates with co-plaintiff Nivea Earl their work, subject of a new civil rights suit over Arkansas licensing standards. - BRIAN CHILSON
  • Brian Chilson
  • PLAINTIFFS: Christine McLean (left) demonstrates with co-plaintiff Nivea Earl their work, subject of a new civil rights suit over Arkansas licensing standards.

The Insitute for Justice, an Arlington, Va.-based libertarian legal organization, has filed a lawsuit in Arkansas challenging the requirement that people who work as hair braiders must first be licensed by the state Cosmetology Board.

The suit was filed in federal court on behalf of Christine McLean of Little Rock and Nivea Earl of Jacksonville. McLean has already been fined for braiding without government permission.

A news release from the group said:

“Natural” or African-style hair braiding has been practiced for over 5,000 years. It is time tested and completely safe. But Arkansas considers braiders to be cosmetologists, so it requires that braiders attend cosmetology school for 1,500 hours and take two exams before they can ask for money for their services. Yet braiding is completely different from cosmetology. Unlike licensed cosmetologists—who cut hair, use caustic chemicals, dyes, and other artificial hair styling techniques—braiders just rely on their fingers and combs to create their styles. What’s more is that cosmetology school does not even teach braiding, and the two exams don’t test it.

Similar lawsuits have been filed by the group in other states.

The Institute makes a larger point that we've long made — many Arkansas regulatory boards exist to control competition more than protect consumers.

The same legal group sued recently over a state Board of Dental Examiners rule that prohibits orthodontists from providing routine teeth cleaning.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Arkansas Supreme Court denies rehearing in death penalty challenge, but delays mandate

    The Arkansas Supreme Court today refused to rehear the case denying Death Row inmates information about drugs used by the state in the lethal injection process.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Welspun layoffs: Another example of corporate welfare folly

    Layoffs at the Welspun pipe plant in Little Rock are a reminder of the folly of corporate welfare and the inability of Arkansas to separate itself from global economic forces. See the Fayetteville shale. And keep a watchful eye on that Sun Paper pulp mill proposed near Arkadelphia.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • Hamburg bank manager gets 21 months for theft

    Melinda Gwin, 49, of Hamburg has been sentenced to 21 months in federal prison and ordered to repay $210,875 stolen from the First National Bank of Crossett. She was sentenced in El Dorado federal court, according to a Justice Department news release.
    • Jul 21, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Homicide victim identified as TC Edwards, local musician

    Little Rock police are still withholding identification of a man found shot to death early Sunday on Howard Street, but multiple reports on social media are tying the death to that of a well-known figure on the local music scene, TC Edwards. The suspect in a criminal case brought over crimes against Edwards will likely be reviewed for potential involvement in his death.
    • Dec 8, 2014
  • Mike Maggio pleads guilty to federal bribery charge

    Former Circuit Judge Mike Maggio of Conway pleaded guilty to federal bribery charges on Friday in U.S. District Court. The offense carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
    • Jan 9, 2015
  • The morning after the Fayetteville civil rights repeal

    A friend in Fayetteville takes the long and optimistic view of human rights despite the disappointing defeat in Fayetteville of a civil rights ordinance that extended protection to LGBT people.
    • Dec 10, 2014

Most Shared

  • Best of Arkansas 2016

    Readers elect their favorites.
  • These Hogs won't be thin

    This may be the strongest returning receiving corps that the Razorbacks have fielded in the post-Petrino days.
  • Trump-Putin 2016

    Among the thousand bizarre aspects of the presidential campaign has been the Donald Trump-Vladimir Putin axis.
  • Hillary hit jobs

    It's always been my conviction that if Hillary Clinton could be appointed president, she'd do a bang-up job. Getting elected, however, might prove more difficult.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation