Saturday, July 5, 2014

The fight for The Pill

Posted By on Sat, Jul 5, 2014 at 7:22 AM

click to enlarge pill-may-affect-lifespan-thumb-200x200.jpg
The New York Times reports that the Obama administration is rushing to find alternatives for comprehensive health coverage for women that includes contraception in the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the Hobby Lobby case. Religious institutions and private corporations claiming religious belief  will be rushing to prevent coverage of contraception in group health insurance policies.

Without an alternative, many women will lose coverage they now have or be denied coverage that was required by the Affordable Care Act.

One simple alternative would be government-provided coverage.

The Times says, politely, that this would be difficult for political and financial reasons.

Read: The House Republicans, particularly, oppose government spending except on their pet projects and they oppose contraception for women. Ultimately, the result of the Hobby Lobby ruling will be clarity on the latter point. The far-right starts with abortion, but it ends with control of women's reproduction, except for the Just Say No method. And you don't have to read much to find some politicians who think No is not an option for married women.

The fight will at least broaden the understanding of what the U.S. Supreme Court has done in the name of corporate personhood and advancement of the majority justices' religious beliefs. Some think the Hobby Lobby ruling, fore example, applies only to morning after pills and IUDs that some THINK work after fertilization (science disagrees). That's the Hobby Lobby policy on its group health coverage. But Hobby Lobby also would have prevailed before this court if it refused coverage of the conventional birth control pill, as some Catholic-controlled corporations favor.

It's becoming clear how disingenuous Justice Alito was in is Hobby Lobby decision, most recently with a speedy order clearing the way for a religious college to dodge the requirement of a form to say it won't provide contraceptive coverage.

Yet officials are struggling to make sense of a sunny sentence in the court’s order on Thursday exempting Wheaton from the opt-out form. “Nothing in this interim order affects the ability of the applicant’s employees and students to obtain, without cost, the full range of F.D.A.-approved contraceptives,” the majority said in the unsigned opinion.

It said Wheaton could merely notify the government of its religious objections in writing rather than send the opt-out form to its coverage providers.

The difference sounds trivial. But it could create quite a roadblock for the Department of Health and Human Services, Justice Sotomayor wrote in dissent. “Does the court intend for H.H.S. to rely on the filing of lawsuits by every entity claiming an exemption?” she asked. She questioned whether the government was supposed to create “a database that tracks every employer’s insurer or third-party administrator nationwide.”

Obstacles to contraception are precisely the aim of Alito and the others bent on imposing their religion on others.

Tags: , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • The debate eve open line

    The Sunday open lines includes some rumination, not happy, about tomorrow night's presidential debate.
    • Sep 25, 2016
  • Ethics Commission begins investigation of Rep. Mike Holcomb

    The state Ethics Commission last week informed a complainant she'd raised sufficient questions about campaign finance filings by Republican Rep. Mike Holcomb to initiate an investigation.
    • Sep 25, 2016
  • Drug companies fight medical marijuana

    Disclosure about financing of the anti-medical marijuana campaign in Arkansas is so far lacking, but it's no secret what's happened in other states — pharmaceutical companies have worked to defeat medical marijuana laws because they create (safer) competition.
    • Sep 25, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Is Arkansas planning to withdraw from PARCC, the Common Core testing consortium?

    Rep. Mark Lowery, a Republican from Maumelle, has introduced a bill that would put the brakes on Arkansas's implementation of standardized testing based on Common Core State Standards. Lowery says the bill is motivated in part because legislators have been told by ADE officials, unofficially, that "the PARCC contract will not be renewed" beyond the current academic year.
    • Feb 3, 2015
  • Tom Cotton's 'bizarre speech' on Guantanamo

    Lots of attention on the web today about remarks by n by U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton. Vox called his remarks on preserving a detention center in Guantanamo Bay " bizarre."
    • Feb 5, 2015
  • League of Women Voters poses questions on Little Rock school takeover

    The League of Women Voters of Pulaski County released a letter today to Arkansas Education Commissioner Tony Wood with questions about future state control of the Little Rock School District.
    • Feb 7, 2015

Most Shared

  • George H.W. Bush will vote for Hillary. Or will he?

    Politico reports that Kathleen Harrington Kennedy Townsend says former Republican President George H.W. Bush is voting for Hillary Clinton for president. The article quotes a Bush spokesman as declining to confirm or deny.
  • Who's harming women?

    Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is an Arkansas Republican. Thus, like the governor and the Republican-majority legislature, she intends to do everything she can to deny women comprehensive medical care, particularly abortion.
  • New normal

    No two presidential candidates since polling began have run up negatives as massive as those of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, who yet won their parties' nominations easily. "What gives?" may be the biggest political mystery in history.
  • Additional rape charges filed against Conway doctor

    Special Prosecutor Jason Barrett has added 11 more victims to two others alleging rape by Dr. Robert Rook of Conway.
  • Big Dam Bridge 100 brings big damn complaint about celebrity rider Hincapie

    The Big Dam Bridge 100 is this weekend and one dedicated biker isn't happy about a celebrity rider, admitted doper George Hincapie.

Most Viewed

  • The debate eve open line

    The Sunday open lines includes some rumination, not happy, about tomorrow night's presidential debate.
  • Drug companies fight medical marijuana

    Disclosure about financing of the anti-medical marijuana campaign in Arkansas is so far lacking, but it's no secret what's happened in other states — pharmaceutical companies have worked to defeat medical marijuana laws because they create (safer) competition.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The debate eve open line

    • A little pre-debate humor-- "There are two things Donald excels at: being on TV and…

    • on September 25, 2016
  • Re: The debate eve open line

    • Not even Richard Nixon was this bad - OR this clinically insane. "For years during…

    • on September 25, 2016
  • Re: The debate eve open line

    • The problem that the Republicans have is that they can't control or even guess what…

    • on September 25, 2016

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation