Monday, August 18, 2014

Michelle Duggar and the Family Council try to torpedo Fayetteville non-discrimination ordinance with lies

Posted By on Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 5:54 PM

click to enlarge Michelle Duggar
  • Michelle Duggar
On Aug. 19, the Fayetteville City Council will consider an ordinance to prohibit discrimination in public services, housing and employment that adds sexual orientation and family status to the familiar list of categories generally protected by federal law. 

It's expected to pass, which is probably why the Arkansas Family Council has ramped up its opposition campaign. After pushing a list of nonsense consequences should the measure pass, the Family Council has now enlisted the help of reality star Michelle Duggar to spread lies about it. Her voice can be heard on a robocall that started making the rounds on Monday in Fayetteville. 

Here's an excerpt (hear the whole thing below) of Duggar's message:

"I don’t believe the citizens of Fayetteville would want males with past child predator convictions that claim they are female to have a legal right to enter private areas that are reserved for women and girls. I doubt that Fayetteville parents would stand for a law that would endanger their daughters or allow them to be traumatized by a man joining them in their private space. We should never place the preference of an adult over the safety and innocence of a child. Parents, who do you want undressing next to your daughter at the public swimming pool’s private changing area?" 

Maybe Duggar, mother of 19, got some coaching from her eldest son, who works for the legislative arm of an anti-gay hate group. Mama Duggar, by the way, lives in Tontitown, not Fayetteville. 

The Fayetteville city attorney's office has already swatted such claims. But what's fear-mongering to bigots?

The claim that this ordinance would provide predators with access to women's restrooms in order to assault or leer at girls or women is nothing more than fear-mongering. This ordinance does allow transgender people to use the bathroom in which they feel most comfortable and physically safe. Transgender people — who are far more likely to be the victims of harassment and violence if forced to use a bathroom that is inconsistent with their gender identity or expression — deserve to have the ability to use the bathroom in peace and safety. Using the bathroom is a basic human function and denying that to a person is inhumane. This ordinance has nothing to do with the concerns and examples Ms. Nichols provided — the acts perpetrated by the criminals in those stories will continue to be criminal acts.



Tags: , , , , , ,

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (36)

Showing 1-36 of 36

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-36 of 36

Add a comment

More by Lindsey Millar

  • The Debtors' Prison Edition

    This week, Max and Lindsey talk about a Sherwood District Court that operates as an illegal debtors’ prison, according to a new ACLU federal lawsuit; Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner’s views on residency requirements, the Little Rock School District and a wide range of other topics; and then they do a quick run through some other topics including the imminent closure of the Broadway Bridge and the selection of Leslie Rutledge’s daddy to head up the Election Commission.
    • Aug 26, 2016
  • A plan for Arkansas to get more out of the money it spends on corrections

    Arkansas's prison population is among the fastest growing in the country. The state now spends more than half of a billion dollars on corrections, a 68 percent increase since 2004, and our prison population, which increased by 21 percent between 2012 and 2016, is expected to rise by another 19 percent between 2016 and 2023 to 21,345. Those were the facts and projections Justice Center, a project of the national nonprofit Council of State Governments, reminded people of yesterday before presenting criminal justice reform proposals.
    • Aug 26, 2016
  • Arkansas criminal justice reform proposal due today

    We'll get a good sense of what criminal justice reform legislation might look like in the 2017 General Assembly later today — as well as some potential stumbling blocks to its passage. Justice Center, an offshoot of the national nonprofit Council of State Governments, will offer policy recommendations to the Legislative Criminal Justice Oversight Task Force this afternoon at the Arkansas Association of Counties conference.
    • Aug 25, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

People who saved…

Most Shared

  • The South, including Arkansas, is failing poor kids who want to go to college

    The Atlantic has an important perspective on the South's "cycle of failing higher education."  Arkansas stands out for the cost barriers it presents to low-income students.
  • School takeovers erode democracy, target minority communities

    New reporting shows state takeover of schools around the country, including in Little Rock, have disproportionately affected minority communities.
  • Arkansas legislator tied to fatal bus crash in Louisiana

    Republican state Rep. David Wallace of Leachville, a current candidate for state Senate, has been identified as the owner of a company that rounded up a group of workers, apparently undocumented aliens, for flood relief work in Louisiana, including one with a poor driving record who was at the wheel in a fatal bus crash on Interstate 10.
  • The boys on the tracks are back

    A lawsuit filed Thursday in federal court in Little Rock bears notice for its effort to breathe life into the 29-year-old story most familiarly known as the Boys on the Tracks.
  • Dumas: Behind the Obamascare headlines

    Ernest Dumas explains in his Arkansas times column this week how Obamacare's problems can be fixed; why it isn't going away, and, most pertinently, why it's more lucrative for Arkansas to continue to expand the coverage pool, not dream up ways to shrink it.

Most Viewed

  • Arkansas legislator tied to fatal bus crash in Louisiana

    Republican state Rep. David Wallace of Leachville, a current candidate for state Senate, has been identified as the owner of a company that rounded up a group of workers, apparently undocumented aliens, for flood relief work in Louisiana, including one with a poor driving record who was at the wheel in a fatal bus crash on Interstate 10.
  • Legislature subpoenas judge to testify about child custody decisions.

    The Legislative Joint Performance Review Committee has subpoenaed Circuit Judge Patricia James, who handles juvenile cases in Pulaski and Perry County, to testify to explain her child custody decisions. It's another example of a power-mad, out-of-control legislature.
  • Conway Mayor Tab Townsell picked to lead Metroplan

    After interviewing two finalists, the Metroplan board chose one of its long-time members, Conway Mayor Tab Townsell, to become director of the planning agency, succeeding the retiring director Jim McKenzie.
  • UPDATE: Metroplan signs off on waiver for Concrete Gulch

    UPDATE: The Metroplan board has voted with scant opposition to waive the existing six-lane limit on area freeways so that the highway department may build a 10-lane concrete gulch through the heart of Little Rock. Leslie Newell Peacock will be back with more after a while. A grassroots group presented spirited opposition, all ignored.
  • Miss Arkansas pageant to leave Hot Springs for Little Rock

    The Miss Arkansas Pageant will relocate next year to Little Rock after 58 years in Hot Springs.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation