Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Surprise: The public prayer crowd welcomes only certain types of prayer

Posted By on Tue, Aug 26, 2014 at 2:20 PM

In a case arising in Greece, N.Y., the U.S. Supreme Court upheld opening public meetings with prayer. Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that the policy was meant to represent, not exclude, all types of people, including non-believers.

Right.

Greece, N.Y., has adopted an official prayer policy. It excludes non-religious citizens and religions not well-established in the city.

Barry Lynn, the executive director the Americans United For Separation of Church and State, torched the new policy as unconstitutional and a warning sign for cities and towns all across the United States which may seek to adopt a similar policy.

"They said they're open to anybody. Now they're not open to anybody," Lynn told TPM. "It's really a scam. This is a way to go back to business as we had sadly always expected it. They only want religious people — frankly they only want Christians — to participate. This is a step backward."

Do you a doubt for a minute that the many schools and governments that open meetings and games in Arkansas with regular Christian prayers, in defiance of court rulings, would open the mike to an atheist, an agnostic or, God forbid, a Muslim?

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