Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Life in Arkansas in WW II internment camp: Hot, ptomaine poisoning

Posted By on Wed, Dec 2, 2015 at 7:19 AM

click to enlarge DIARY PAGE: Records arrival in internment camp in Jerome, Ark. - YALE UNIVERSITY/NY TIMES
  • Yale University/NY Times
  • DIARY PAGE: Records arrival in internment camp in Jerome, Ark.

The New York Times today features
a new exhibit at Yale University  on life in the World War II internment camps to which Americans of Japanese descent were confined.

The camps included two in Arkansas and the Times article focuses on a diary kept at the camp in Jerome by Yonekazu Satoda, now 94. Somehow, his diary survived, passing through many hands before winding up at Yale, which brought Satoda to New Haven for opening of the exhibit.

Mr. Satoda, who gives his age as “94½,” was 22 when he and his family were uprooted from their home in San Francisco and sent to an assembly center in Fresno, Calif., and then to the Jerome Relocation Center in the mosquito-ridden Arkansas Delta. They were among an estimated 120,000 people of Japanese descent, about two-thirds of them United States citizens, who were regarded as enemy aliens and incarcerated after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

“Today was supposed to be my graduation day at Cal,” Mr. Satoda noted on May 13, 1942, the second day of a confinement that lasted almost three years.

“Got hell from Mom for fooling around with women,” he wrote six days later.

“Hot as hell today,” he reported the following evening. “Ptomaine poisoning in mess hall,” he added. “3 or 4 hundred sick.”

JEROME CENTER - WIKIPEDIA
  • Wikipedia
  • JEROME CENTER

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