Monday, December 7, 2015

Former Saline sheriff Bruce Pennington gets year for wire fraud

Posted By on Mon, Dec 7, 2015 at 4:43 PM

U.S. Attorney Chris Thyer announced that former Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington, 64, was sentenced to one year plus one day of incarceration for wire fraud.

Pennington had pleaded guilty to using money from his campaign account to pay for personal expenses charged to his sheriff's office credit card. This followed some highly publicized problems related to alcohol.

Penning was sheriff from 2008 until his resignation Oct. 1, 2013. His sentence was enhanced for committing a crime while in a position of public trust. Judge Kristine Baker also fined him $2,500 and specified three years of supervised release.

Still to come in federal court is sentencing of former state Sen. Paul Bookout for spending campaign money on personal expenses. To date only an Ethics Commission sanction and resignation of office followed findings that former Lt. Gov. Mark Darr used campaign and state money for personal expenses. He's paid fines and repaid state money improperly spent.

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