Thursday, October 6, 2016

Hutchinson names three to circuit court vacancies, one to prosecutor

Posted By on Thu, Oct 6, 2016 at 11:22 AM

Gov. Asa Hutchinson today announced plans to appoint four lawyers to fill three circuit judgeships and a prosecutor's office vacant because existing officeholders were elected to new offices. All will serve through 2018.

* Gail Inman-Campbell of Alpena will  replace Circuit Judge Shawn Womack, who was elected to the state Supreme Corut.

* Maureen Hazinski Harrod of Heber Springs will replace Circuit Judge Dan Kemp, elected chief justice of the Supreme Court.

* Chris Carnahan of Conway will replace Circuit Judge Mike Murphy, who's moving to the state Court of Appeals.

* Holly Meyer of Heber Springs, who'd been filling a judgeship vacancy, will become 16th District prosecuting attorney, replacing Don McSpadden, who was elected to a circuit judgeship.

More background on the appointees here. The judges may not run to succeed themselves in the positions.

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Speaking of Circuit Judgeships, Asa Hutchinson

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