Monday, October 17, 2016

Presidential candidate Tom Cotton in Iowa

Posted By on Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 7:03 AM

click to enlarge RUNNING IN IOWA: Tom Cotton. - TWITTER/IOWA STARTING LINE
  • Twitter/Iowa Starting Line
  • RUNNING IN IOWA: Tom Cotton.
Here's another take on Sen. Tom Cotton's visit to Iowa last week to plow ground for a race for president in 2020. It's by the Washington Post's Dave Weigel.

Nice point in the story. Weigel mentions a lament by Sen. Chuck Grassley about his inability to pass criminal justice reform legislation.  Weigel notes that Cotton was a key obstacle (as he is to so many things).

Weigh noted, too, that Cotton insisted he could work with a President Clinton but also threw in that he'd be warm to continued investigation of her e-mail.  Cotton didn't disavow Trump in any way in his Iowa travels, a reflection of the crowds he met who didn't seem inclined to desert Trump either.

The reader comments were interesting. Not a lot of warmth for Cotton . And one commenter came armed with a recitation of Cotton's record:

Guess Cotton failed to mention his Anti-Farm bill votes believing the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program included waste and fraud, and he then voted for a bill that stripped funding from food stamps in June 2013.

Cotton voted in favor of the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, a bill to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.

"... Cotton’s argument was that Hispanic voters do not care about immigration reform.[50] The House decided to not consider the bill.[50]

In August 2013, Cotton voted against federal student loan legislation.

Then, Cotton specifically blocked the nominations of Butts and ambassador nominees to Sweden and Norway after the Secret Service had leaked private information about a fellow member of Congress, even though that issue was unrelated to those nominees.[83] Cotton eventually released his holds on the nominees to Sweden and Norway, but kept his hold on Butts' nomination.[83] Butts told New York Times columnist Frank Bruni that she had gone to see Cotton about his objections to her nomination, and Cotton explained to her that because he knew that the president and Butts were friends, it was a way to "inflict special pain on the president,"

So, more evidence, Cotton would rather fight instead of get America going.

Tom Cotton was groomed to be a Republican politician for years by the Republican establishment (Claremont Institute). Always taking the military or political jobs - however fleetingly, that would show well on a resume.

He turned into a Teabag.



Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Speaking of...

Comments (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
    • Apr 20, 2017
  • Death Row inmates argue to keep stay of execution in place; urge 8th Circuit not to 'rush' analysis

    Early this morning, attorneys for nine Death Row inmates, filed an argument with the 8th United States Court of Appeals contesting the state's effort to override Judge Kristine Baker's order Saturday that halted executions scheduled this month.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • Federal judge denies execution stay for Don Davis but larger stay continues

    Don Davis, who's been moved to the killing facility of the state prison for killing tonight at 7 p.m. if a stay of execution is lifted in another federal suit, sought a stay in another federal court Sunday, but the request was denied.
    • Apr 17, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Most Shared

  • Executionpalooza

    Appearances count. I was struck by a single sentence over the weekend in a full page of coverage in The New York Times devoted to the killing spree in Arkansas, beginning with a front-page account of the recent flurry of legal filings on pending executions and continuing inside with an interview with Damien Echols, the former death row inmate.
  • Art bull

    "God, I hate art," my late friend The Doctor used to say.
  • Not justice

    The strongest, most enduring calls for the death penalty come from those who feel deeply the moral righteousness of "eye-for-an-eye" justice, or retribution. From the depths of pain and the heights of moral offense comes the cry, "The suffering you cause is the suffering you shall receive!" From the true moral insight that punishment should fit the crime, cool logic concludes, "Killers should be killed." Yet I say: retribution yes; death penalty no.
  • Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

    Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.
  • The Ledell Lee execution thread

    Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.

Visit Arkansas

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Haralson, Smith named to Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame

Chuck Haralson and Ken Smith were inducted into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame during the 43rd annual Governor’s Conference on Tourism

Most Viewed

  • Lee's lawyer writes about executed man's last hours

    Lee Short, the lawyer for Ledell Lee, the man Arkansas put to death just before midnight last night, posted on Facebook the following letter of thanks for personal support and a bit about Lee's last hours, distributing his possessions and talking to family.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

Slideshows

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation