Thursday, February 16, 2017

Director to resign from state court administrative office

Posted By on Thu, Feb 16, 2017 at 1:26 PM

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Dan Kemp announced today the resignation of J.D. Gingerich, long-time director of the administrative office of the courts.

According to a release, Gingerich said he'd leave next month to become director of a new partnership between the National Center for State Courts and the William H. Bowen School of Law. He's been director of the office since 1988 and is said to be the longest serving state court administrator in the country. The office works with courts throughout the state in addition to handling administrative responsibilities in Little Rock for the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals.

Said Kemp in the release:

I have worked with J.D. since he first became the director of the Administrative Office of the Courts. I appreciate his service, leadership and wise counsel during his tenure at the AOC. I wish him well in his future endeavors.
The last time there was a major court administrative hire, for Supreme Court clerk, a rump group of justices usurped the traditional power of the chief justice and overruled then-Chief Justice Jim Hannah's pick for the job. On taking office this year, Kemp gave a strong indication he intended to wield the traditional power accorded his office by law in administrative matters, which would indicate he'll control the choice of the next office director.

Right?

The job currently pays almost $115,000 a year.

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