Friday, May 29, 2009

Friday To-Do: The See EP release show

Posted By on Fri, May 29, 2009 at 9:57 AM

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Check out the See in the latest Rock Candy Presents video on our home page player.

THE SEE
10 p.m., Sticky Fingerz.

There are few, if any, new local bands with as much buzz surrounding them as the See. Formed last summer by Tyler Nance (drums), Joe Yoder (vocals) and Dylan Yelenich (bass/keyboard), the trio's built its reputation on steady gigging and a sturdy, infectious brand of indie rock that recalls power trios of yore. You know, back before everything got all twee and feely. Or went disco. In other words, the See offers the right mix of dissonance and melody, features a drummer who beats the hell out of his kit (not long ago that meant he spent the last song of the band's set standing up) and a bassist/keyboardist who plays meaty riffs and typically bounces around the stage like he's having a seizure. Plus, lead singer Yoder — tall, broad-shouldered, with short hair, a beard and severe eyes — looks kind of like an evil Russian wrestler and isn't afraid to fist pump unironically. Paired with big, earnest vocals, that helps give everything an epic, anthemic quality. All the qualities we've come to expect in the band live come across in its fine new EP, “Bars of Gold.” Its release is the reason for the show. Stella Fancy and Big Boots open.
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