Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Wednesday-Sunday To-Do: Ozark Foothills FilmFest

Posted By on Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 10:50 AM

Harold Otts The Lost Souls screens at the Ozark Foothills FilmFest pic
  • Harold Ott's "The Lost Souls" screens at the Ozark Foothills FilmFest.

OZARK FOOTHILLS FILMFEST
Various times and venues in Batesville. $3-$25.

The multi-day Ozark Foothills FilmFest returns to Batesville, with another intriguing lineup of short and feature-length narrative and documentary films, lectures and panel discussions.

Of the latter, an interesting one will surely be "The Female Face of Indie Film," which includes, among others, Arkansas native Juli Jackson. With help from a grant from the festival, Jackson made "45RPM," a road movie shot in Arkansas about an obsessive record collector and a young woman trying to find a deeper understanding of her family.

Another big highlight includes a screening of Josef von Sternberg's silent 1927 proto-gangster flick "Underworld," accompanied by live music from the Alloy Orchestra, the trio that also played at the festival in 2011 and includes Mission of Burma founder Roger Miller. They band is "The best in the world at accompanying silent films," according to film critic Roger Ebert.

Also, music geeks should check out "The Lost Souls," a 54-minute doc about The Lost Souls, a Jacksonville-based quartet that cut some legendary garage rock singles back in the mid-1960s. Filmmaker Harold Ott is also the man behind the "Lost Souls" series of compilation CDs, featuring tons of long-lost garage rock ravers from the Natural State.

Here's the full festival schedule.

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