Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Nate Powell’s “March” wins Coretta Scott King Honors

Posted By on Wed, Jan 29, 2014 at 1:13 PM

click to enlarge ae_feature1-1.jpg

The American Library Association announced this week that “March: Book One” has been named a Coretta Scott King Honor Book. “March,” the first graphic novel in a trilogy on Civil Rights hero Congressman John Lewis, was illustrated by North Little Rock native Nate Powell, who worked closely with Lewis and co-author Andrew Aydin on the project. The honor marks only the second time that the Coretta Scott King committee has selected a graphic novel. “March” has been on the New York Times bestseller list for more than 20 weeks. 

If you missed Robert Bell's interview with Powell last summer, go check it out

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