Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Why Riverfest stopped payment on CeeLo's check

Posted By on Tue, May 27, 2014 at 3:09 PM

click to enlarge ceelo.jpg

Yesterday, we reported that Riverfest had a contractual dispute with headliner CeeLo Green over the length of his set Saturday night at the First Security Amphitheatre, and would not pay him anything beyond their initial deposit: "Most entertainers require a 10-50% deposit, and CeeLo's was on the higher end of the deposit range," said board spokesperson Cheddy Wigginton. This morning, in a statement to THV, CeeLo's manager denied that the festival had withheld payment, saying that "despite reports, they were given a check after his performance for the full amount discussed." 

So which is it? Wigginton clarifies: "He has not been paid in full, we stopped payment on his check today. And CeeLo’s manager knew, when they left Riverfest, that the check they had in hand was going to have a stop payment on it until we could rectify the situation." Wigginton notes that they were debating the contract backstage "during and immediately after the set": 

When he was late getting on, we were back there trying to figure out what was going on, and were telling him that he had an obligation to play. Once he hit the stage, we waited to see how long he played. At the end, when he only played 40 minutes, we started talking about our options, and proposed to him exactly what we did today.

He went on to note that they "have not heard from [CeeLo] since" and that "we haven't reached out to them." As to how much CeeLo was supposed to be paid, Wigginton said, "I’m not at liberty to discuss the exact amount, we’re bound by certain things we can say and not say. Somebody else might pay him more or pay him less — it’s a negotiation process — and we were happy with the overall total amount we were going to pay him had the performance lived up to the contractual obligations." Asked whether or not it was a fair assumption that CeeLo was the festival's highest paid artist, he said, "That’s not a fair assumption, and he was not."

Tags: , ,

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Will Stephenson

  • A guide to New Year's Eve

    Amasa Hines, Cory Branan, The Big Dam Horns, DJ Sno White and more.
    • Dec 25, 2014
  • Holiday Staff Picks: 'Lilyhammer,' The Dream Scene, Christmas gift ideas, recipes and more

    Perfect for the season: The Netflix series "Lilyhammer," starring Steve Van Zandt as a protected witness mobster living in Norway. Lots of snow. Van Zandt brings his felonious ways to prim and proper Norway in slapstick fashion as a nightclub operator with Norwegian good fellows. Great scenery. A good dose of information on Scandinavian socialism and folkways.
    • Dec 19, 2014
  • More »

Most Shared

  • Humanists sue over Baxter County nativity scene. Looks like another winner

    The Baxter Bulletin reported today on a lawsuit filed on behalf of a Baxter County resident over the Nativity scene that has been erected on the Baxter County Courthouse lawn for decades by local lawyer Rick Spencer.
  • Opinions split within GOP on "law and order" issues. Where will Asa stand?

    The New York Times reports that some Republicans are trending away from the lock-em-up-and-throw-away-the-key approach to criminal justice embraced by the party's old guard, in part out of a recognition that minority votes matter now more than ever. Asa Hutchinson wants to reach out to black voters — what better place to start?
  • U.S. growth rate highest in ten years; Arkansas economy also looking up

    National GDP grew by 5 percent in the third quarter, according to a revised figure by the U.S. Commerce Department. Arkansas Business reported yesterday that forecasters also predict a strong year of growth ahead for Arkansas. We're still waiting for Obamacare to deliver its promised economic implosion.
  • Here's to Hutchinson, McCain and American revulsion at torture

    On Nov. 16, 1776, Gen. George Washington stood on the Jersey Palisades and peered across the Hudson River through his telescope as the British tortured American militiamen who had surrendered and then put them to the sword. Hearing the screams of his men, according to an aide, Washington turned and sobbed "with the tenderness of a child."
  • Easy on the pay raises

    An independent commission appointed by the governor, legislative leaders and the chief justice began work last week to fulfill part of Issue 3, the constitutional amendment that eased term limits, banned lobbyist gifts to legislators (sort of) and provided a mechanism for pay raises.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2014 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation