Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Oxford American will launch Kickstarter campaign to fund annual music issue

Posted By on Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 8:45 PM

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The Oxford American will turn to the crowd-funding platform  Kickstarter this September to help fund its 16th a nnual music issue, slated for release on Dec. 1. Music from the lone-star state headlines this year’s magazine, titled "The Music of Texas," and funds from the campaign will help pay for the issue’s associated compact-disc mixtape.

South on Main will provide a space for the OA’s “Kick-start the Kickstarter” party at 5:30 p.m on Tuesday, Sept. 2, which will feature singer-songwriter and native Texan Mark Currey. From a press release:

“Mark Currey is a singer-songwriter whose roots run through Ft. Worth, Texas, and the deep pine forests of southeast Arkansas. Inspired by roots rock, classic country, and Americana music, as well as Southern gothic literature, Currey is a storyteller searching for the honest expression of his own Southern voice. In addition to his songwriting, Currey’s essays have appeared in various national publications. He has also been a featured storyteller on NPR’s “Tales From the South” with his story “Ft Worth Blues” appearing in the print version of the popular radio show. As a solo artist, and with members of the Little Rock band Monkhouse, Currey has shared the stage with artists such as Billy Joe Shaver, Todd Snider, Wanda Jackson, David Olney, Amanda Shires, and Monte Montgomery.”

Might be worth adding that “South on Main’s barman David Burnette will concoct special Texas-inspired libations for the celebration."

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