Friday, April 10, 2015

Ride the Tiger: The Enduring Mystery of Doug Hream Blunt

Posted By on Fri, Apr 10, 2015 at 12:26 PM

gentle.jpg

Doug Hream Blunt - "Gentle Persuasion"
You think you know something, that you've been around and heard what there is to hear, and then you hear Doug Hream Blunt. Born in Arkansas, of course, Blunt is among our state's least appreciated musical exports. He was a collector of vinyl records — he particularly admired The Whispers and Jimi Hendrix. He was a frustrated musician, not in the sense that he couldn't produce, but in the sense that the results were frustrating to him. He moved to San Francisco, where he met a music teacher and aspiring record producer named Victor Flaviani. They recorded Blunt's only album, "Gentle Persuasion," in a matter of days.

For a while he had a regular gig at a local hospital. He played a public access TV show called "CITYVISIONS." He had kids. He had a stroke. He spent his free time learning to play the congas and the trumpet. What little we know about Blunt, we know thanks to a blogger based in New Zealand named Martyn Pepperell, who stumbled on one of Blunt's songs and decided to track him down. "I was absolutely floored over by this waking dream of a tune," Pepperell wrote. He found Blunt at home in the Bay Area, spending time with his three children. “They really are a handful,” Blunt told him. They talked about his music, about Jimi Hendrix, about the future. 

More info here. Below: Blunt's performance on "CITYVISIONS." While you watch (if you watch), remember that music doesn't have to be anything it doesn't want to be. 

Ride The Tiger from Doug Hream Blunt on Vimeo.

Love Land from Doug Hream Blunt on Vimeo.


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