Sunday, June 1, 2014

Armchair philosophers. prison and Edward Snowden

Posted By on Sun, Jun 1, 2014 at 11:04 PM

Oh, the woods are full of folks who vow that they would go to prison for their beliefs. When such people prattle on like this, they usually think in terms of days, weeks, months or maybe, if they have a lousy lawyer, a few years.

Nobody thinks about decades. Or if they do, it’s pretty much always about Other People doing the decades in prison . . . not that many folks are lining up, volunteering to put in those decades themselves.

I have never been to prison, but over the years, I have made the friendship of many an individual who has, and the one lesson I have taken to heart from everything they have told me is this:

I don’t want to go to prison. For any reason, for any length of time.

Call me chickenshit, but that’s just how the wind blows.

I think that the point I am trying to make is that Edward Snowden is a Whistleblower, and he has every right to try to stay out of prison - even moving to another country - in his efforts to avoid arrest and imprisonment.

The Internet is full of folks who aren’t facing prison themselves calling him a “coward,” but the Internet makes tough guys of us all.

Those who wave the banner of Thoreau, as if he and others like him are somehow morally superior to Snowden, are simply talking through their hats, and should visit 21st Century Earth some time.

Sometimes prison is unavoidable, but if you can avoid it, then do so. And if Snowden wants to come back, and can make some kind of deal with the Justice Department, ,maybe serve a few less years prison, well . . . ah hell, people will find plenty to whine about that as, I suppose.


On the Air with Pamela Foster

Writer Pamela Foster will be the guest on my show this week.

Two decades ago Pamela Foster married a man she describes as her “hero,” a disabled Vietnam veteran who also suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Her book, “My Life with a Wounded Warrior,” is a collection of her blogs dealing with PTSD, loving a man with PTSD and its effects on the lives of those who love those who suffer the traumas of war.

During the interview Foster also discusses medical issues facing veterans, such as the recent problems in the VA system, as well as her other writings, including her western novel, “Ridgeline,” whose main character is a Civil veteran dealing with PTSD, or “Solder’s Heart,” as it was known at the time.

Show days and times:

Monday - 6am/6pm
Wednesday - 6am/6pm
Friday - 6am/6pm

Fayetteville Public Access Television is shown on Channel 218 of the Cox Channel line-up in Fayetteville, and on Channel 99 of AT&T’s U-Verse, which reaches viewers from Bella Vista to Fort Smith.

Fayetteville Public Access TV can also be seen online at:

Folks can also purchase copies of individual programs by calling 479-444-3433.


Quote of the Day

The economy depends about as much an economists as much as the weather does on weather forecasters. - Jean-Paul Kauffman

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